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This Week on Tour – FedEx Cup Playoffs, Web.com Tour, LPGA Tour, Champions Tour, European Tour

Written by: Tony Korologos | Wednesday, August 26th, 2015
Categories: Champions TourEuropean TourFedEx CupJordan SpiethLPGA TourPGA TourPro GolfRory McIloryWeb.com Tour
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FedEx Cup LogoPGA TOUR
The Barclays
Dates: Aug. 27-30
Venue: Plainfield Country Club, Edison, N.J.

Tournament Airtimes on Golf Channel (Eastern):
Thursday 2-6 p.m. (Live) / 9 p.m.-1 a.m. (Replay)
Friday 2-6 p.m. (Live) / 10:30 p.m.-2:30 a.m. (Replay)
Saturday 1-2:30 p.m. (Live) / 10:30 p.m.-3 a.m. (Replay)
Sunday Noon-1:30 p.m. (Live) / 10:30 p.m.-3 a.m. (Replay)

Broadcast Notes:
Kicking off the FedExCup Playoffs: The PGA TOUR 2014-15 regular season concluded last week after 43 events and the top-125 in the FedExCup standings earned their 2015-16 PGA TOUR cards and became eligible to compete in the Playoffs. 121 players are currently in the field this week, and the top-100 in the standings following Sunday’s final round will be eligible to compete in next week’s Deutsche Bank Championship near Boston.
Mahan defends: Hunter Mahan won by two shots for his sixth career PGA TOUR win.
Headlining the field: Jordan Spieth, Jason Day, Bubba Watson, Rickie Fowler, Jimmy Walker, Justin Rose, Dustin Johnson, Brooks Koepka, Zach Johnson, Patrick Reed and Robert Streb.

WEB.COM TOUR
WinCo Foods Portland Open
Dates: Aug. 27-30
Venue: Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club (Witch Hollow Course), North Plains, Oregon

Tournament Airtimes on Golf Channel (Eastern):
Thursday 6-8:30 p.m. (Live)
Friday 8-10 p.m. (Tape delay)
Saturday 7-9:30 p.m. (Live)
Sunday 7-9:30 p.m. (Live) / 5-6 a.m. (Monday replay)

Broadcast Notes:
Finalizing “The 25”: The top-25 on the Web.com Tour money list following Sunday’s final round will earn their 2015-16 PGA TOUR card. Players finishing 26-100 on the money list will be eligible to compete for 25 additional PGA TOUR cards in the four-event Web.com Tour Finals, along with players having finished 126-200 in the PGA TOUR’s FedExCup standings.
Headlining the field: Patton Kizzire, Martin Piller, Dawie van der Walt, Peter Malnati, Smylie Kaufman, Wes Roach, Si Woo Kim, Kelly Kraft, Shane Bertsch and Abraham Ancer.

LPGA TOUR
Yokohama Tire LPGA Classic
Dates: Aug. 27-30
Venue: RTJ Golf Trail at Capitol Hill (Senator Course), Prattville, Ala.

Tournament Airtimes on Golf Channel (Eastern):
Thursday 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. (Live)
Friday 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. (Live) / 4:30-6 a.m. (Saturday replay)
Saturday 5-7 p.m. (Live) / 5-6 a.m. (Sunday replay)
Sunday 5-7 p.m. (Live)

Broadcast Notes:
Henderson to be featured in “Rookie Spotlight” during Friday’s coverage: 17-year-old Brooke Henderson – who was granted LPGA Tour membership last week after winning the Cambia Portland Classic – will be featured in “Rookie Spotlight” during Friday’s second round coverage.
Hur defends: Mi Jung Hur finished four shots ahead of Stacy Lewis for his second career LPGA Tour victory.
Headlining the field: Stacy Lewis, Brooke Henderson, Lexi Thompson, Brittany Lincicome, Anna Nordqvist, Brittany Lang, Angela Stanford, Charley Hull and Cheyenne Woods.

CHAMPIONS TOUR
Dick’s Sporting Goods Open
Dates: Aug. 28-30
Venue: En-Joie Golf Course, Endicott, N.Y.

Tournament Airtimes on Golf Channel (Eastern):
Friday 6-8 p.m. / 4-6 p.m. (Streaming on Golf Live Extra)
Saturday 3-5 p.m. (Live) / 3-5 a.m. (Sunday replay)
Sunday 2-5 p.m. (Live) / 3-5 a.m. (Monday replay)

Broadcast Notes:
Langer defends: Bernhard Langer finished one stroke ahead of Woody Austin and Mark O’Meara for his 23rd career Champions Tour win.
Headlining the field: Bernhard Langer, Jeff Maggert, Kenny Perry, Mark O’Meara, Jay Haas, Marco Dawson, Kevin Sutherland, Joe Durant, Woody Austin and Lee Janzen.

EUROPEAN TOUR
D+D Real Czech Masters
Dates: Aug. 27-30
Venue: Albatross Golf Resort, Prague, Czech Republic

Tournament Airtimes on Golf Channel (Eastern):
Thursday 5-7 a.m. / 9-11:30 a.m. (Live)
Friday 5-7 a.m. / 9-11:30 a.m. (Live)
Saturday 7-11 a.m. (Live)
Sunday 6:30-11 a.m. (Live)

Broadcast Notes:
Headlining the field: Victor Dubuisson, Eddie Pepperell, Thorbjorn Olesen, Peter Uihlein, David Horsey, Matthew Fitzpatrick, Bradley Dredge, Gregory Bourdy and James Morrison.


Spieth Tops Latest Golf World Rankings – Woods Drops to 286th

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, August 17th, 2015
Categories: European TourFedEx CupPGA TourPro GolfRory McIloryTiger Woods
Tags:
Ranking
8-17-15
Name Events Played
1 Jordan Spieth 56
2 Rory McIlroy 46
3 Jason Day 39
4 Bubba Watson 45
5 Justin Rose 52
6 Jim Furyk 42
7 Dustin Johnson 40
8 Rickie Fowler 53
9 Henrik Stenson 52
10 Sergio Garcia 49
11 Zach Johnson 52
12 Adam Scott 42
13 Louis Oosthuizen 46
14 Jimmy Walker 53
15 Matt Kuchar 54
16 Hideki Matsuyama 53
17 Brooks Koepka 56
18 Patrick Reed 57
19 J.B. Holmes 46
20 Branden Grace 57
21 Martin Kaymer 55
22 Shane Lowry 52
23 Billy Horschel 57
24 Phil Mickelson 44
25 Chris Kirk 51
26 Danny Willett 56
27 Paul Casey 52
28 Brandt Snedeker 52
29 Bernd Wiesberger 59
30 Bill Haas 53
31 Marc Leishman 51
32 Kevin Na 53
33 Robert Streb 51
34 Ian Poulter 48
35 Lee Westwood 54
36 Kevin Kisner 57
37 Ryan Palmer 48
38 Anirban Lahiri 54
39 Gary Woodland 51
40 David Lingmerth 57
41 Thongchai Jaidee 62
42 Jamie Donaldson 55
43 Ryan Moore 48
44 Russell Henley 53
45 Charl Schwartzel 60
46 Charley Hoffman 53
47 Keegan Bradley 54
48 Victor Dubuisson 50
49 Francesco Molinari 60
50 Marc Warren 58
51 Webb Simpson 49
52 Hunter Mahan 53
53 Brendon Todd 57
54 Danny Lee 65
55 Byeong Hun An 54
56 Tommy Fleetwood 61
57 Steven Bowditch 65
58 Joost Luiten 54
59 John Senden 55
60 Andy Sullivan 57
61 Miguel A Jimenez 50
62 George Coetzee 56
63 Graeme McDowell 51
64 Ben Martin 55
65 Luke Donald 52
66 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 59
67 Alexander Levy 59
68 Matt Every 52
69 Scott Piercy 41
70 Matt Jones 53
71 Cameron Tringale 59
72 Soren Kjeldsen 57
73 Stephen Gallacher 57
74 Alexander Noren 19
75 Justin Thomas 54
76 Richie Ramsay 47
77 Brian Harman 59
78 Brendan Steele 52
79 Russell Knox 57
80 Pablo Larrazabal 54
81 Chris Wood 47
82 James Morrison 57
83 Harris English 55
84 Daniel Berger 49
85 Tyrrell Hatton 55
86 Rafael Cabrera Bello 57
87 David Howell 60
88 Tim Clark 40
89 Tony Finau 54
90 Jason Bohn 50
91 Cameron Smith 33
92 Hiroshi Iwata 53
93 Jason Dufner 45
94 Eddie Pepperell 50
95 Shawn Stefani 46
96 George McNeill 48
97 Graham Delaet 49
98 Kevin Streelman 56
99 James Hahn 53
100 Troy Merritt 52
286 Tiger Woods 25

Putt Like Jordan Spieth?

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, August 10th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf For WomenGolf InstructionInstructionJordan Spieth
Tags:

Jordan Spieth Masters 2015During the last couple of practice sessions on the putting green I tried the technique Jordan Spieth sometimes uses on shorter putts.  He will actually look at the hole and execute his putting stroke.  He’s not looking at his golf ball or having his head/eyes down in the stroke.  Conceptually it is not that odd.  Think about foul-shooting in basketball.  The shooter is looking at the basket, not the ball.  Well maybe anyone but Shaquille O’Neal.  No idea what he was ever looking at.

It was weird trying this technique.  I made the first one.  It felt strange and was very odd to see the hole, then have the ball appear in my field of vision, let alone being on the proper line and then going into the hole.

I’d say using this technique I was making a large percentage of the putts in short range.  I was surprised to make as many as I did without even looking at the ball.  I suppose that means my stroke is fairly pure and consistent, even when I’m not looking at the ball.

Will I put this in play?  Nope.  I make a lot of putts and I’m very confident in my putting.  No need to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Someone should have told that to Tiger Woods.


Top 15 Ways Jordan Spieth Can Guarantee Failing To Break Jack Nicklaus’s Major Record

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, July 28th, 2015
Categories: (British) Open ChampionshipJordan SpiethPGA TourPro GolfThe MastersTiger Woods
Tags:

Jordan Spieth Masters 2015Naturally the press has gone into a complete Spiethgasm.  Let’s face it, we haven’t see a player this good since Tiger Woods and the numbers prove it.  By his 22nd birthday yesterday, Spieth had racked up five PGA Tour wins including two majors, the 2015 Masters and the 2015 U.S. Open.  He’s already a lock for PGA Tour Player of the Year.  When Tiger Woods was 22, he had six victories to his name, but only one major championship, the 1997 Masters.

For 15 years we’ve countlessly read and heard the nauseatingly repetitive debate in the press and on social media as to whether or not Tiger Woods would break Jack Nicklaus’s major championship record of 18.  Woods has been sitting on 14 since 2008 and there is no part of his current game which would lead us to believe he will win even one more, let alone five more.

So the discussion has moved to Speith.  At this early age he is already one major ahead of Tiger and unfortunately, that same discussion has begun:  “Will Jordan Spieth break Jack Nicklaus’s major championship record?”  Puhlease.  Let’s not put the golf cart in front of the golfer.  Even if he won two majors every year it would take him eight more years to tie Jack.   So many things could happen between now and 18 majors for Spieth.

In my sick and twisted mind I thought it would be great to produce a top ten list of ways Spieth could guarantee failing to break Jack’s record.  Someone had to do it.  But 10 wasn’t enough.

Drumroll please…  Top 15 ways Jordan Spieth can guarantee failing to break Jack Nicklaus’s major championship record:

#15: Retire early

#14: Baseline shifts

#13: Switch to an inferior golf club sponsor

#12: Unhealthy love affairs… with launch monitors

#11: Drop F-Bombs in front of small children

#10: Trash his body

#9: Treat the press and fans like crap

#8: Become a PR and brand puppet

#7: Become “Ranger Rick,” hitting flawless and perfect golf shots on the range but not being able to take them to the course

#6: Focus too much on “release patterns” and not enough on knocking a golf ball in the hole

#5: Focus too much on “traj” and not enough on knocking a golf ball in the hole

#4: Focus too much on “spin rates” and not enough on knocking a golf ball in the hole

#3: Fire swing coach and hire new one.  Break swing down completely and rebuild it from scratch to “get better”

#2: Fire new swing coach and hire a newer one.  Break swing down completely and rebuild it from scratch to get better… again.

#1: Fail to activate glutes


2015 U.S. Open Commentary

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, June 22nd, 2015
Categories: GolfJordan SpiethPGA TourPro GolfRory McIloryTiger WoodsU.S. OPENUSGA
Tags:

I’m a bit hammered this morning.  Certainly a case of U.S. Open hangover.  I had expected to be getting ready to watch a Monday playoff today, the day after Sunday’s final U.S. Open round.  Dustin Johnson’s stunning and heartbreaking 3-putt on the final hole nixed that great idea.  Boy I feel bad for the guy.  He looked like he’d seen a ghost after that 3-putt.  I probably would have thrown up after that, if I was in that situation.  Hell, I would have probably thrown up before each putt…

Hats off to Jordan Spieth for putting the winning number up on the board and putting the pressure on DJ to tie him.  The Spieth story is becoming legendary in a very short period of time.  It is quite a time in golf, with Tiger seemingly on the way out and Spieth and McIlory taking over.

Chambers Bay

Chambers Bay quickly became a very polarizing topic of discussion on golf TV, interwebs, and socials.  Having been to Chambers Bay myself, and playing dozens of rounds of golf in Scotland, I’m a fan of hard, fast, brown golf.  So I get what course architect Robert Trent Jones II was going after.  The course’s location though, meant not just hard conditions, but Poa annua grass on the greens.  We deal with Poa here in Salt Lake too.  It grows faster than other grasses and has tougher leaves.  So when a green isn’t 100% Poa (like Pebble Beach), it gets bumpy.  It can be very frustrating to putt on greens like that and many pros voiced their displeasure with the bumps, along with their displeasure of the USGA setup. Fans see a brown course and think it is dead. They expect golf to be like Augusta National and the Masters Tournament. In reality, almost no courses have that kind of budget and with water as short as it is becoming, minimalist brown golf is the future. Plus, it is more fun in my opinion.

Chambers Bay Golf Course

Chambers Bay – Click for more…

I engaged (perhaps still) in some great debates on my Twitter and Facebook pages with friends about the setup and conditions.  It seems, almost like the fans or haters of Tiger Woods, that people either loved the course or hated it.

Gary Player had some pretty harsh commentary about Chambers Bay.  I was quite surprised he called out RTJ like he did. Then again, he’s a golf course architect and RTJ is a competitor who just had his course featured in the U.S. Open.  So I take his commentary in that context a bit:

On Sunday the greens looked to be rolling quite well.  Spieth made an incredible long-range putt for birdie on the 16th which had perfect speed and dropped in on the side of the hole.  No bumps there. DJ’s 3-putts all rolled nicely, unfortunately for him the first two didn’t roll nicely into the hole.

Jordan Spieth

Well if the golf media wasn’t already in a Spiethgasm, they will be now. Be ready for the Spieth-slam talk, and for the ever popular “will Spieth break Jack’s major championship record?” drivel. That of course between the “hottest women in golf” and “hot wives and girlfriends” photo gallery garbage.

How can you not have a Spiethgasm though? This 21 year old kid is doing something special, and I’m glad I’m here to witness it. What’s more is he’s not an overpowering player like Tiger Woods was (yeah I said was). He’s not long, but he’s long enough. There are really no holes in his game. No weaknesses I can see. The next few years are going to be a joy to watch.

Dustin Johnson

I felt really bad for DJ after the 3-putt. The look on his face was unreal. He was melting. I melted too. He’s had many chances to close out majors. Undoubtedly he has the game. He needs to overcome the pressure and mental aspects of winning the big ones and he’ll get it done.

Tiger Woods

What’s wrong with Tiger Woods? A lot apparently. After rounds of 80 (+10) and 76 (+6) he went home early. I tuned in just in time Friday to watch him DUFF a 3-wood. It was a horrid shot, so bad that I recorded it and watched it several times in disbelief. There were so many things wrong with that particular swing that it looked like a 15 handicapper.

There are many theories as to what Tiger’s problem is. A new one discussed in my golf group is his possible fear that his will be the biggest fall from the top in sports history. I don’t know what the problem is, and it is likely a combination of many many things. Physically he looks fine, which leaves the only possible solutions within the 5-inch course between his ears.

Jason Day

I watched Jason Day collapse on the 18th hole Saturday, a result of vertigo. Man that’s terrible and I felt for the guy. He did manage to finish the tournament but what a story it would have been had he won the tournament. A valiant effort by Day.

Rory McIlory

Rory McIlory is no Tiger Woods. Tiger was much more consistent when in his best years. Rory is super-streaky. When he’s hot, nobody can beat him. When not, he can miss cuts. McIlory showed some life in the tournament, but in the end was not a factor. No worries about his game. That’s the way he rolls.

Branden Grace

Wow tough deal for Branden Grace (also known as “Branden Gracen” on the Fox broadcast).  Standing on the 16th tee he was at -5, tied with Spieth, two shots ahead of the nearest competitors.  One swing later his 3-wood goes out of bounds and kills his chances of winning.  Brutal.

Fox Sports Coverage

Funny how so many people hated the Fox Sports coverage of the Open, even before they saw it. It seems those same people hated the course before they saw it in action as well. I didn’t expect the Fox broadcast to be perfect and it certainly was not. There were dozens of instances of bad camera work, shaky commentary, and technical issues.

There was a little too much talking, almost like baseball announcers who think they have to fill up all the dead space with sound.  Many complain(ed) that all Greg Norman does is talk about himself.  Seemed like Greg was fine to me and not this self centered personality they made him out to be.

What I did like was the drone coverage, since I too build and fly drones, mostly for flying over golf courses and shooting video and photos.

foxdrone1

Many complained about not seeing the shots, and I agree. Fox had it tough though, having to break themselves in at such a difficult venue.

Overall I’d give Fox a C grade and I do expect they’ll analyze what they did, listen to the critics, and try to improve their product.

Conclusion

In the end the 2015 U.S. Open was exciting, controversial with regards to course setup like EVERY U.S. Open is, and produced a stellar leader board of the world’s best golfers. The USGA got what they wanted, a handful of players under par and a test that filtered out all but one of the top two players in the world as its champion.


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