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First Look: GolfJet Jet Pack

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, January 4th, 2018
Categories: GolfGolf BallsGolf For WomenGolf Gear

In for review is a “Jet Pack” from GolfJet. No I’m not going to be flying around on a jet pack, or riding around in a private jet. Coach for me unfortunately. The Jet Pack is a high end package containing some premium golf balls, tees, a glove, ball marker, and a mobile app for yardages and score keeping.

Golf Jet - Jet Pack

GolfJet – Jet Pack

From GolfJet

GolfJet gives subscribers the Tour pro treatment, providing them with a set of new premium golf balls, a fresh cabretta leather glove, and detailed knowledge about the course ahead of them — before each round. Think of us as your personal sponsor. Our products will help take your game to the next level. Meanwhile, the GolfJet Connect smartphone app will immerse you into a golf experience with detailed personalized numbers and data. It’s your personal digital caddy that even connects all of your friends into your own personalized tour.

Jet Packs can be purchased as one-offs, or even more fun by monthly subscription. Just when you thought you were going to run out of Golf Jet Jet3 or Jet4 golf balls, a new box arrives on your doorstep, assuming the porch pirates didn’t get to it first.

The Jet3 is a 3-piece construction ball with urethane cover. As you guessed the Jet4 is a 4-piece golf ball, also with a urethane cover. Urethane is the secret to “tour” spin and feel around the greens.

When the winter temperatures permit, I’ll put some of these jet balls and tees into play and see how they fly.  Stay tuned for the full review.

Used Golf Balls From Two Guys With Balls

Written by: Tony Korologos | Wednesday, December 6th, 2017
Categories: Golf BallsGolf For WomenGolf GearReviews

It’s a great day when you find that brand new Titleist ProV1 or other expensive “tour” ball in the bushes. Mint condition! #winning! Just made $5.00.  It’s no big deal that some other golfer hit that ball before you.  It’s got plenty of great shots left in it. So why not consider that when purchasing golf balls?  There are options out there to allow you to get your golf balls, premium pro lines or others, for a fraction of the original retail price. One great example is “Two Guys With Balls.”

Two Guys With Balls is a seller of pre-owned golf balls.  I’ve just picked up a couple dozen myself, and I’ll be damned if I can tell the difference between most of them and a brand new one.


The ordering process is easy.  Find your ball, choose the quality level, pay a very reasonable price, and the product shows up at your door a few days later.

The Two Guys With Balls website has a very friendly and easy to use interface. From the home page, pick your pellet. Once on the ball page you can select how many and what quality level you want. There are three quality levels in their grading scale: Eagle, Birdie, and Par. Eagles are the highest quality, like new. Birdie has some signs of use. Par has definite signs of use which may also affect the performance. The levels are priced accordingly.

I chose the Eagle grade for some Bridgestone B330’s. It doesn’t cost that much more to go first class (unless you’re flying, then it actually does cost a lot more). They’re sweet. They were only $23.99 per dozen, almost half the price of a new box. I’m thrilled with the quality.

Giving Back

One great aspect to giving Two Guys some business is that they’ll donate a portion of the profit from your purchase to the Arnie’s Army Charitable Foundation.” We believe that children and youth should be given the opportunity to develop the tools and values that will allow them to achieve success in life.” Amen Two Guys.


I dig what Two Guys With Balls is doing and wish them the best of luck in their golf venture. They have an easy to use shopping cart, excellent product quality, and I can get some feel-goods knowing a portion of the profit is going to a good cause. That’s two good causes: my golf game and Arnie’s Army Charitable Foundation! Well played. #winning

Forté Golf Tour-Performance S Golf Ball Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, August 7th, 2017
Categories: Golf BallsGolf EquipmentGolf For WomenGolf GearReviews

I recently reviewed the 6-layer golf ball from Forté Golf, an Australian based company.  That’s the first of two golf ball models from Forté Golf.  Today’s review is the Tour-Performance S model.  This is a ball with a different construction than their 6-layer, but still focuses on “tour” performance.  What does that mean? We hear “tour” all the time when referring to golf equipment, especially golf balls.  Tour typically means high short game spin and a soft urethane type of cover for control in the short game.  Let’s take a look at the Tour-Performance S.

Tour-Performance S Overview

The Tour-Performance S is a 3-layer ball, often referred to as 3-piece construction.  The layers are the core, mantle, and cover. Each layer has specific properties and materials designed specifically for performance characteristics throughout the various shots.  Golf ball construction is tough.  Lower spin rates are great for longer distance and accuracy with the long clubs.  But higher spin rate is desired for shorter shots. That high spin provides bite and control.

The core primarily gives the ball its compression, and feel off the driver. The core of the Tour Performance S is soft and produces a low spin rate with the driver.  The mantle blends the core with the cast urethane cover.  The urethane cover provides the ball’s feel and control in short game shots, even putting.

On The Course


Driving with the TPS is excellent.  I love the softer core. I’m able to hit this ball as far most brand name tour quality balls. Just yesterday I was in a tournament in high winds and was still able to hit some long drives which held their line nicely.  I even got to put my name on the long drive sign, but that didn’t last long I’m sure.


The soft core and urethane cover make for great feeling shots with the irons.  Longer irons compress well and my accuracy with them is great. Shorter irons and especially wedges stop on a dime and leave 7 cents change. In my last round I nearly holed out two shots from roughly 100 yards. Quite sure one lipped out.  Nice to have a 10 inch birdie putt now and then.


Short game shots, chipping and pitching around the green are huge beneficiaries of the urethane cover.  I feel like I have total control and stopping power with my wedges.

Putting the S is terrific as well.  It rolls true and is very easy to control distance.


One problem “tour” balls have is durability. It’s contradictory to have a soft cover and high durability. That said the TPS is very durable. I’ve played one ball for 2-3 rounds and it barely shows any wear.


The ultimate golf ball has low spin with the driver and high spin on shorter shots.  The S performs highly on both ends of the spectrum and easily competes with tour caliber balls from the big name brands.

Snell Golf My Tour Ball Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, July 17th, 2017
Categories: GolfGolf BallsGolf EquipmentGolf For WomenGolf GearReviews

Dean Snell has likely been involved in your golf equipment for many years.  You just didn’t know it.  Dean is one of the designers of many of the world’s top golf balls like the Titleist ProV1, TaylorMade TP Red & Black, TaylorMade Penta, and many others.  Dean is now making his own tour-caliber and amateur-focused golf balls under the Snell Golf brand.  Today I’m reviewing the MTB, or “My Tour Ball.”
Snell MTB My Tour Golf Ball

About the Snell Golf MTB

“Tour” is the word most commonly used for golf balls which have performance characteristics in line with what a PGA Tour professional would require.  Those characteristics would include high spin and a soft cover, which aren’t necessarily characteristics which would benefit a high handicap golfer.  Why?  Pros can control their spin.  High handicappers generally can’t.  So the high ‘cappers will have serious distance loss due to side-spin, and will have very bad accuracy as the ball will be hooking or slicing more.  Further, most higher handicap players come up short, and a ball that has high spin and stops quickly or even backs up on a green, isn’t good in that situation.

For the lower handicap players and pros though, the MTB is a very affordable and high performance alternative to the $50-$60 per dozen tour offerings from the big name brands.  Let’s take a look at the construction of the ball.

MTB Construction

The MTB is a 3-piece or 3-layer golf ball.  Each layer produces performance properties and when combined gives the ball it’s overall performance.

The first layer of the MTB if we go inside-out, is the core. Just like the earth’s core, the core on the MTB is the center. Most of the mass of the golf ball resides in the core and the ball’s general feel and “compression” comes from this layer. Softer cores result in lower spin, and therefore less side-spin. Soft cores can mean more accurate drives because of the reduced spin. But there’s a fine line with soft cores because as the core gets softer the distance is lessened. Snell’s MTB combines a soft core with technology which still helps produce the max ball speed allowed by golf’s governing bodies, and thus the most optimized combination of low driver spin and distance.

The mantle is the next layer. The mantle layer still has influence on the overall ball speed and compression. The mantle’s true performance benefits are in iron shots and short game shots. The mantle helps to increase spin as the shots get shorter, which is optimum. Low spin on long shots and higher spin on short shots.

The cover of the ball is perhaps the most crucial in terms of giving a golf ball the “tour” label. Tour balls typically have a “urethane” cover while cheaper balls may have covers made from other rubber/plastic materials like ionomer. Urethane gives a golf ball very soft feel in the short game and putting, and high spin on short shots, chips, and pitches. When you see tour pros “yank the cable” and spin a ball back to the crowd’s joy, that’s almost guaranteed a urethane cover ball. Pros and low-handicap golfers want the spin and control of urethane and the MTB has it.

Snell MTB My Tour Golf Ball

On The Course

I admit I’m a bit late to the party with my review.  I actually received a box of MTB’s to try close to two years ago.  At that time I was playing a different ball and didn’t want to change.  A couple of years later I got some more and finally decided to play them again this season as my game was in such bad shape I needed a gear and mental overhaul.

From the tee the MTB is comparable to a tour ball such as the ProV1.  This is bit more spin off the driver than balls I’ve tended toward in the past like the Bridgestone B330, and thus can be less accurate for me if my swing gets a little wild.  I also find that extra spin results in a little shorter overall distance off the driver for me.  These are the reasons I’d previously not opted to have the MTB as my “gamer” ball in the past.  There have been a few occasions where all launch factors have been perfect and I’ve hit massively long drives with the MTB.  Accidents happen.  Blind squirrel syndrome.  That said the ball is plenty long still and it does offer me the chance to “work the ball” (curve it) if I need to.  Balls with less driver spin are harder to work.

Approach and in is where the MTB has made a big difference in my game.  I’ve found my distance control has been much improved, though I must admit I also changed to different irons at the same time as my ball switch.  Trust me on this. The irons are not an issue. I really love the feel of the ball off my irons and I’ve been gaining more and more confidence with each round.  I’ve had some bad distance issues this season and when I made the iron and ball switch, those issues vanished.

I’m sticking approach shots now, even backing some up.  Most recently I recall some very nice mid-to-long irons stopping on a dime, like a 6-iron I hit last weekend from about 185 yards.  The ball mark was in the shadow of the ball.  Mark first, then fix. Don’t accidentally move the ball when fixing the mark!

Short game shots are where the MTB really shines.  My chipping and pitching (which I’ve whined about for a long time online) has been 1000x better.  I’m actually saving par often now because I have better feel and control around the greens. I’m finally able to get the ball close enough to the hole to make a par-saving putt.  In the case of par-5 holes, I’m chipping it close and making a 2-3 footer for birdie now.  Huge difference on the scorecard.

I’m enjoying the feel of putting with the MTB as well.  The urethane cover feels nice and soft and I have solid distance control.  When I miss a putt (not often!), I know my next one is going to be very close.  I like to “seam up” the MTB with it’s alignment arrows, which are also along the ball’s seam.  That helps my alignment.

Last week I played 41 holes with the MTB.  13 holes were a net match and then an 18 hole round a couple of days later.  Yes I trusted my net match outcome to the MTB and glad I did.  I won the match.  My total in relation to par over those 41 holes last week: +1.


Tour balls are typically not durable.  It’s hard to make a all with a soft urethane cover which resists scuffs, but the MTB does a fine job of it.  I expect a tour ball like this to last a round or two before I retire it to the practice ball bag, but the MTB’s are lasting longer than that.

Let’s do a little test.  Which of the balls below has been in play for 36+ holes?

It’s a trick question.  Both balls have been played over 36 holes.


At $31.99 via the Snell Golf website, these tour-level balls are roughly half the cost of some of the big name brand balls and offer comparable or even better performance.  Call it a two-fer.

Forté Golf Apex 6 – 6 Layer Golf Ball

Written by: Tony Korologos | Sunday, June 25th, 2017
Categories: Golf BallsGolf EquipmentGolf For WomenGolf GearReviews

Question, do golf balls from Australia spin the opposite direction?  Let’s find out.  Today’s review if the 6-layer golf ball from Austalia’s Forté Golf, the Apex 6.  Why six layers? Because six is better than five of course.

Apex 6 Key Features

  • Soft, low compression/high energy core reduces spin off the tee to help increase distance
  • Soft mantle layer helps the ball’s feel
  • Multi layer construction responds to multiple golfer swing speeds
  • Surlyn ionomer resin helps increase feel and control on short game shots
  • Urethane cover provides soft feel and spin around the greens

On The Course

I don’t do one-hole or one-round reviews. I played the Apex 6 for several months.  I found the ball to be as long as any tour ball I’ve played and accurate because of the low driver spin characteristics.  Length wise it is comparable to any of the high end tour balls I’ve played from the big name brands.

The ball’s driver trajectory for me was medium and it handled windy conditions well, not prone to blowing off line badly.

I played one ball over several rounds.  Aside from a minor wedge scuff or two the ball showed little signs of wear.  So the cover was quite durable.  There’s a fine line between durability and high spin in tour level ball covers.

Around the greens I had nice control, as much as my ailing game has had that is.


My only complaint with the Apex 6 is ball that it feels a bit hard.  The hardness is noticeable with the driver, but most pronounced in the irons.

One other critique is with the Forté Golf website.  I know the company is based out of Australia, but the copy on the site and some of the terms wreak of bad Chinese to English translation. For example:

Ideal for players who demands the best or nothing. Underneath the cast urethane cover is the world’s first 6 piece golf ball! It guarantees to outperform the competition in all aspect.

Along with some grammatical (Chinese to English) errors, there are misspelled words, like “Lonomer” which should read “Ionomer.”  And “the best or nothing” sounds quite a bit like a Mercedes Benz ad, hehe.

Final Thoughts

Critiques aside I can confidently game this ball and it performs well in varying conditions.  The Apex 6 is a solid ball, long off the tee and responsive in the short game.

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