Hooked on Golf Blog logo

2017 MAKE GOLF GREAT TO PLAY AGAIN

Written by: Tony Korologos | Sunday, March 12th, 2017
Categories: GolfHackersMiscellaneous
Tags:

I just played my first round of golf for 2017.  I played okay, considering I haven’t played since November.  Four months.  I did prove one theory I had, which is I can basically shoot 80 or break 80 will little to no practice or even not playing for months, simply relying on basic ability.  I shot 80, including a double on the 17th after a plugged lie under the lip of the green side bunker.  What does that mean? Not much.  Many golfers strive to break 80. There have been dozens of books and training videos out there with the title “Breaking 80,” but it’s not interesting to me.

What Makes Golf Interesting, or Not Interesting to Me?

So what is interesting then about golf to me if breaking 80 isn’t?  Breaking say, 76?  75?  72?  Shooting in the 60’s?  The fact is I’m going to probably do those things this year, even several times.  While it’s nice to shoot a low number, I think feeling solid shots and being in control of what I’m doing is what makes golf interesting and fun for me. Or perhaps attempting difficult shots and having the ability to pull them off.  Sometimes those things don’t equate to low numbers.

What of 2017?

So what am I doing?  At the end of last season I had burned out on golf. I’d become frustrated about how stagnant it had become, and how the game itself is infinitely more difficult the better one becomes.  Unlike other things that challenge me, like computer programming or building drones, golf is something that can’t be mastered.  I can write a program and eventually get it to do what it is supposed to do.  I can build a drone and make it fly.  On rare occasion, I can put together all facets, or perhaps 3/4 of the facets of my game.  Perhaps once or twice a year. Sometimes not even once in a year or two.  When that happens is a mystery.  One day it happens, the next day is a disaster. Unlike programming or building drones, which have incremental and tangible milestones, golf is fleeting.

Changes

I’m going to change some things for 2017. Shake it up. I went from thinking about quitting to buying a season pass to the Salt Lake City courses.  I can golf any day, anytime now, even holidays on that pass.  Also, I will not be renewing my membership in a club that I used to be president of for seven years, River Oaks.  Things have changed there management wise, and I’m no longer able to contribute my services to the league and course in exchange for golf privileges.  And probably most relevant, I burned out there.

A group I play with at my other home course is sort of dissolving.  That group soured a bit, though I still enjoy playing with them once in a while, like today.  I plan to try and hook up with a different group of golfers who are all very good.  Loose your wallet if you don’t play well good.  I also plan to use that city pass to spread my rounds across the seven courses, even the ones that suck are lower end.  I played one of them last year and it was short, quirky, and kind of ghetto for lack of a better word. It was actually fun.

Change of scenery I suppose is one of the primary focuses for 17.  Changing clubs, groups, courses… and maybe it will all add up to a change in attitude.

If not, then I just dumped a bunch of money into a pass which will be a waste.  I don’t like wasting things, especially money.


One response to “2017 MAKE GOLF GREAT TO PLAY AGAIN”

  1. myoshbrk says:

    I ran across your article and I just would like to put my two cents in of why golf is so frustrating for amateurs. Golf can’t be taught, it’s a game that is learned over time. You can’t just get lessons on mechanics, you have to play with golfers that know how to “play” the game and know how to ultimately keep their score low. Golf is about controlling emotions, making good decisions, and minimizing risk. I’m a pro golfer myself and it’s maddening that pro golfers are not allowed to give playing lessons to the masses especially since pro golfers are usually living out of their car and need the extra cash. Instead, playing lessons are left to the thousands of “teaching pros” out that can’t break 80 themselves. For the first time ever, I’ve provided an event that’s a playing lesson on steroids…

Leave a Reply