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Scotland’s Balcomie Links: 7 Golf Balls Within 20 Feet on the Green, All Legit

Written by: Tony Korologos | Friday, September 2nd, 2016
Categories: Golf
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Old Scottish golf courses are pretty quirky and because of those quirky designs and layouts, unusual things can happen. One entertaining example happened on my last trip to Balcomie Links in Crail, Scotland. What a tremendous course Balcomie Links is. I’ll feature the course more later.

I was the last of my group to reach the (I think) 11th green. The 11th is known as “Lang Whang,” and the hole got its name long before the Anthony Wiener days. Up the hill on this par-5 I wasn’t sure if I’d reached the green or not, or where my ball even was. When I reached the green, my friends (The Lads) and some other gentlemen were on the green laughing.

Crail_Balcomie_Links_05

On the green, not more than 20 feet apart, were seven golf balls. This hole’s green is shared with I believe the par-4 8th. Both groups approaching hit the same area. I was happy to find that my ball was one of them.

It’s not often you see seven balls on a green so close together in a real round of golf, and none of them are provisionals, mulligans, or practice shots.

FORE!


Tweet of the Month

Written by: Tony Korologos | Saturday, August 27th, 2016
Categories: Golf
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Thanks to John Boyne and Caddie Golf Tours for the great tweet, the great friendship, and the great memories.


St Andrews New Course Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, February 29th, 2016
Categories: Course ReviewsGolfGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf For WomenReviewsTravel
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Now that I’ve confirmed the pending third HOG World Tour trip to St Andrews, Scotland, I can’t help having Scotland on my mind.  It is a magical place.  Sadly 99.999% of the courses in the United States do not play like true scottish links courses.   Scottish golf is a natural, hard style of golf I far prefer to the overly-soft, over-watered, too green, over-manicured courses here in the USA.

One thing most golfers who have not been to there don’t realize is that there are a ton of courses in the town of St Andrews, not just the Old Course.  That’s why I’m always giving people grief when they refer to the Old Course as St Andrews.  “Hey have you played St Andrews?” they ask.  I say, “which course?”  St Andrews is the name of the town, not the course(s).  In the town itself the other courses besides the Old Course include the New Course, Jubilee Course, Eden Course, Strathtyrum Course, The Dukes, and the Balgove Course.   All but the Balgove are within walking distance.  In a few minutes by car one can find even more courses: Castle Course, Torrance Course, Kittocks Course,  Saint Andrews Bay Course, and Kingsbarns Golf Links.

The closest course to the Old Course is the New Course.  While the Old Course dates back to around 1400, the “New” Course opened in 1895.  Yeah, that’s “new” alright.  The New is literally next to the Old.  You can miss a fairway on the Old and the ball may end up on the New, and vice versa.  I don’t recommend that though, because the New is out of bounds if you are on the Old and vice versa.

New Course Overview

Old Tom Morris is the architect of the New Course.  The new is a par-71 course which tips out a 6,625 yards, short by modern standards.  The new has many very similar designs and feels as the Old does, but is a little more straightforward and less quirky.

The course rating is 72.8 with a slope of 127 from the tips.  For those of you in the UK, the standard scratch score (SSS) is 73.  The rating would make the New just a tiny bit tougher than it’s next door neighbor, the Old.

Tee

From the tee, the new presents some great challenges.  The course can be a wee bit (as they say in Scotland) tight.  Errant tee shots will be penalized by bunkers, deep rough and in the worst case, gorse.  If you don’t know what gorse is count yourself lucky.  Gorse is a very nasty dark green bush with thorns which feasts on a strict diet of golf balls and the occasional golfer.  Going into the gorse after a ball is usually not a good idea, unless you like scratching the hell out of yourself and ripping your fine golf apparel to shreds.

Some tee shots can be intimidating

Given the shorter nature of this course and the typical hard ground, driver is not necessary on many of the par-4 or even par-5 holes.  The longest par-5 is 518 yards.  Once again, distance isn’t the most important part of the tee shot at the New.  Accuracy is.

Fairway

The fairways can be tight on the New Course, but fairly flat in most places.  If the golfer has managed to avoid the pitfalls mentioned in the tee description, the approach from the fairway is fairly straightforward.

Left rough approach on the 18th hole

If the golfer misses the fairway but avoids bunkers and gorse, the rough can be very thick and inconsistent.  Difficult lies in the rough may be tempting for the golfer to hit the hero shot, but it is often wise to be more conservative and get the ball back into play.

Green

The greens at the New are quite different than the Old. They’re considerably smaller and less undulating but still guarded well via bunkering and adjoining gorse and rough areas.

Because of the smaller greens, the hard ground, and the ways the greens are protected by bunkering or natural obstacles, I find the greens at the New fairly hard to hit. This puts a premium on short game. A green reached in regulation is not an overly difficult two-putt proposition like the gigantic greens on the Old.

Amenities

The St Andrews Links Clubhouse is a very spacious and large facility featuring the pro shop, Swilcan Restaurant and lockers with showers. I’ve enjoyed a few meals in the Swilcan Restaurant and knocked back some refreshing beverages while overlooking the 18th green. Such a great spot.

St Andrews Links Clubhouse

St Andrews Links Clubhouse

Next to the clubhouse is a nice practice green for getting the feel and working on short game. There is no driving range. The nearest range is a bit of a walk or very short drive to the St Andrews Links Golf Academy.

Tip

The St Andrews Links Trust sells a few different great golf packages. I highly recommend purchasing a three-day or seven-day “ticket.” These packages allow the golfer to play unlimited golf in either three days or seven days on the six Links Trust courses other than the Old. In the middle of the summer there is so much daylight that a hardcore golfer could literally play 3-4 rounds in ONE DAY. I’ve done the 3-day twice now and loved it. In one day I played 18 on the the Jubilee, 18 on the New, and a relaxing 9-holes on the Strathtyrum Course.

Final Thoughts

The New is a fantastic links style golf course. It’s a great course on its own and serves as an excellent alternative or backup for times when the golfer is not able to get a tee time on the Old Course. Plus the cost is a fraction of the Old.

I highly recommend experiencing the New Course when traveling to St Andrews to play golf. The New provides a tremendous and satisfying links experience.

Related Links

Kingsbarns Golf Links Review

Balcomie Links Golf Course, Crail Scotland

Fairmont Hotel St Andrews Review

Ardgowan Hotel St Andrews Review


Review: Balcomie Golf Links, Crail, Scotland

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015
Categories: Course ReviewsGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf LifeGolf LifestyleHOG World TourOlympic GolfReviewsTravel
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Not far from the Old Course in St Andrews, Scotland is a fabulous, authentic, old-world links course in the town of Crail called Balcomie Links.  Balcomie Links is one of two courses on the property.  The other course is Craighead Links which opened in 1998.  Craighead Links was designed by Gil Hanse, one of today’s most popular golf architects, and the architect of the 2016 Rio Olympics golf course.

Old Tom Morris is the architect of Balcomie Links.  Old Tom finished up Balcomie the same year he finished up the “New Course” in St Andrews, 1895.  The course plays to a par of 69, and a total yardage of 5,861.  If you are a yardage snob you’ll have to adjust a wee bit.  Once you do, you’ll truly appreciate the splendor of this course and the overall par and length will matter not.

Balcomie Golf Links

Fantastic Balcomie Golf Links in Crail, Scotland

Perfectly Understated

The personality of Balcomie Links is fantastically understated.  The pro shop has to be the coolest shops I’ve ever seen.  I imagine golfers sitting on this bench as children, learning to golf from mom and dad.  They grow up sitting on this bench.  They grow old sitting on this bench, and life is good for them.  I’m envious.

Balcomie Links

Coolest Pro Shop in the World!

Location

Located a 20-30 minute drive from St Andrews, Balcomie Links is located on an unbelievable stretch of land which borders the North Sea. I can’t think of more than one or two holes which don’t have a view of the North Sea, and most of the holes are right on the water. If this course was in California it would give Pebble Beach a run for its money.

Pebble who?

In fact, the whole time we played the course my group of pals kept playfully looking around and saying “Pebble who?”

Tee

Tee shots at Balcomie Links are so enjoyable and fun.  Tom Morris was quite creative with the layout, and there are tee boxes in some very interesting places.  Some tee boxes are by old buildings (below), while others cross holes.  Some are by mortar and rock OB walls that must be hundreds of years old.

balcomie links crail scotland

Par-5 2nd Tee – “Ower The Knowe”

Fairway

The fairways at Balcomie links welcome golf shots and don’t provide too much penalty if they’re not perfect.  The wide fairways provide an enjoyable walk, but on rare occasions present challenging angles and blind shots if the ball finds the wrong resting place.

Fairway approach to the double green on the 11th

Some fairways, in old Scottish links golf style, cross each other.  Keep a keen eye open for other players and rest assured the locals who know the course will do the same for you.

Green

Due to typical high winds, the greens at Balcomie Links only run between a seven to a nine on the stimpmeter.  In other words fairly slow.  American golfers may be used to faster greens, so it takes a few strokes to get used to whacking putts that hard.

crail balcomie

Forced carry to an elevated green with the North Sea in the background. Fabulous!

The greens are not severe, but are tastefully protected via bunkering and other hazards, like the North Sea!  A few holes feature some strong elevation change approaching the green.

Crail Golfing Society

The town of Crail is the home of Crail Golfing Society, the 7th oldest golf club in the world.  The clubhouse overlooks the links, with the beautiful blue water in the background. Crail Golfing Society was kind enough to allow us to enjoy their fine food and a wee pint following our round.  One of the best meals I had on my last Scotland trip was accompanied by one of the best views, as seen below.

crail golfing society

Room With A View – Crail Golfing Society – click for more

Final Thoughts

When trying to come up with words to describe the experience at Balcomie Links the first two which came to mind were “authentic” and “true.”  Golf here is authentic, as are the people.  There’s nothing gaudy or commercial here.  Balcomie Links is about TRUE and traditional Scottish links golf and is uninfluenced by the outside world.

Boy is it a world I’d love to live in.

Related Links

See the whole gallery of Balcomie Golf Links images!

Carnoustie Golf Links Review

Kingsbarns Golf Links Review

Ardgowan Hotel St Andrews Review

Fairmont Hotel St Andrews Review


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