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Not Many Golf Rounds Left in 2015

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, October 22nd, 2015
Categories: GolfHackersMiscellaneous

Due to a horrible email mix-up I’m not on a plane to the Bahamas right now.  Believe me, this is not the news I was looking for.  So I’m home for the next four days when I thought I’d be soaking up the beach and some resort golf.  Boo.  I’ll make the best of it though, and play golf a couple of times here and take a small road trip with the wife and my little boy.

Today I’m going to sneak out and catch a round at Wingpointe, a course I thought I’d played for the last time a week ago.  It’s closing in a few weeks.  I also anticipate playing Sunday.  After that it’s Tuesday the 27th for the annual Hell Night tournament at my club.

14th Hole - Wingpointe Golf Course

14th Hole – Wingpointe Golf Course

That’s probably it for the season.  The weather may be okay for playing, but I’ve been struggling this year with my game and think I really need a mental break from it.  For the first time in my golfing life, I’m looking forward to winter.


Last Round at Utah’s Links, Wingpointe Golf Course

Written by: Tony Korologos | Wednesday, October 14th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf Courses
Tags:

Today was likely the last round I’ll ever play at one of my all time favorite golf courses, Wingpointe.  Wingpointe is at the Salt Lake City International Airport.  The course is known as “Utah’s Links,” and is the design of well known golf architect Arthur Hills.

14th Hole - Wingpointe Golf Course

14th Hole – Wingpointe Golf Course

The city of Salt Lake owns/operates the course and will be shutting it down November 15th, 2015.  It’s a damn shame.

Panorama view of Wingpointe’s 3rd and 4th holes

I have many great memories at “Wingy” and she will be missed. Somehow, despite the bad soil there, the greens were always fantastic.

Panorama of Wingpointe’s 13th and 14th holes

For many years Wingpointe was my home course, and I had a nice relationship with the pro Lynn Langren. From the black tees, the course is (soon to be was) one of the most challenging courses in the state, especially with wind.

The course seemed to always fit my eye and I’ve shot many great rounds there under par.

If it isn’t too cold I may try to play it on the last day it is open, if it isn’t covered in snow.


Is it Me, or Do Many Who Run Golf Courses Not Understand Economics?

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, October 8th, 2015
Categories: BoneheadsGolfGolf Courses

We are constantly bombarded with golf’s bad press and the whining that the game is dying, shrinking, and losing players by the thousands.  So what’s the answer?  Raise green fee prices!

Wingpointe Golf Course

Wingpointe Golf Course

A local course is going to be shut down here in Salt Lake called Wingpointe.  It’s the airport course.  As its life comes to an end, they’re offering a farewell price of $25 per round, with cart, roughly half of what that would normally cost.  Guess what?  The place is jammed.  We called for a tee time and the entire sheet was jammed.

Economics 101

Price goes down, demand goes up.

Price goes up, demand goes down.

Simple economics, right?  So why the hell do many who manage golf courses not get this?  What’s better?  Having a course with 10 players on it at $50 a pop, or a course with 100 players on it at $25 a pop?  And what about the money those extra 90 players spend on range balls and in the cafe?  Some may even buy some balls or even apparel and gear in the pro shop.  How much more could the course make in BEER sales alone with an extra 90 players a day?

Another shop in town gets that.  A certain times of year, like when they are aerating, they offer smoking deals like the 50% off one above.  Guess what? The course is packed.  And when it offers those great prices it builds up a customer base.  It builds up relationships with customers who will come back.

I know all this is just crazy talk.  You golf courses and dumb municipalities who run them go ahead and carry on.  When you’re sucking wind and losing money, go ahead and raise your prices even more.  Run the rest of your remaining customers off.  You might as well go out of business sooner.  Perhaps someone will buy your course for pennies on the dollar and run it better than you.


Welcome to the New Bonneville Golf Course

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, October 6th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf CoursesGolf For Women
Tags:

Pop quiz:  What’s the first thing golf courses who just switched to a new automated sprinkling system do?

Answer: Over-water.

For decades Bonneville Golf Course here in Salt Lake City, Utah has been the most popular public course in the state and for good reason. It is awesome.  For decades the course has been known for being a “hard and fast” course which calls for the player to accurately calculate approach shots, landing them at just the right place.  Some shots needed to hit short and bounce up in order to stay on the putting surface.

Commonplace at Bonney now... bring your divot tool.

Commonplace at Bonney now… bring your divot tool.

Over this summer the course has switched from manual, hand-watering to a new automated irrigation system.  The change is done and the new sprinklers are working, really well.  The course is as green as ever but it is very, very different.  The greens are no longer the fast and hard greens I’ve grown to love (and hate in a good way on some days).  They’re country club soft.  Shots which once would bounce over the green when hitting the front half are now backing up.  On the 3rd hole, a green which is very hard to stick, I hit a wedge to the middle of the green and spun it back off and down the hill.  On #10 I did the same thing, hitting the middle of the green then spinning entirely off the surface.

Some shots this softness has helped though.  I hit an 8-iron to the par-5 first, a back pin.  My shot flew to the back pin, hitting about a foot short of the flag.  Normally that shot would bounce over the green and leave an impossible downhill chip. Instead, I had a 15″ eagle putt.

The speed of the greens is considerably slower right now.  This could of course be a factor of the blade length of the mowers, or it could be that they’re just slower because they’re more moist.  Those of us who are used to “Bonney” speed and the fine and tough breaks those fast greens produces are now befuddled by putts which come up short and don’t break.

I’m not saying the change is good or bad.  It’s just, “different.”  The strategy has changed.  Rather than hitting shots with the goal of hitting the front or even in front of the green, one must think pin high and go even longer than that.  I’m finding that any club less than an 8-iron requires getting the to-the-pin yardage and aiming 10-15 feet past it.

Welcome to the new Bonneville.

 


It’s Presidents Cup Week But Do You Care?

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, October 5th, 2015
Categories: GolfPGA TourPro Golf
Tags:

Presidents CupYay!  It’s Presidents Cup week.  This event is a competition between a USA team of golfers pitted against an international squad of players who are not Ryder Cuppers.  So it’s basically the USA versus anyone but europe.

I’ve been waiting all year to watch this event.  Okay, maybe not.  I actually have no interest in this event whatsoever.  I’m curious to know if any of you HOG patrons out there do care about this event?  After all, the USA team has won it every time since the inception of this red-headed stepchild of the Ryder Cup, except for 2003 when the event was tied.

Actually I think the 2003 Presidents Cup was the last one I watched.

College football season is here (as is pro football of course) and that’s where my interests lie at this time of year, especially since my Utah Utes are now ranked #5 in the country.


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