Golf Courses


Review: Donald Ross Course at French Lick Resort

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, June 28th, 2016
Categories: Course ReviewsGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf For WomenHOG World TourReviewsTravel
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Dornoch, Scotland born Donald Ross began his golf career as an apprentice to Old Tom Morris at the Old Course in St Andrews. Old Tom was the greenskeeper for the Old Course in St Andrews and had designed many of the most famous courses in Scotland and the UK including Carnoustie, Prestwick, Muirfield, Machrihanish, Jubilee, and Balcomie Links. I’ve played a few of those.

Ross moved to the United States in 1899 where he began arguably the most successful architectural career in the history of golf. Ross is credited for designing 600 golf courses. Amongst those 600 are some of the world’s most famous and respected courses, which still stand the test of time. A few of Ross’s most notable courses include Pinehurst No. 2, Seminole, Oak Hill and Oakland Hills. A couple of others I like to add to the list are ones I’ve had the pleasure of playing, Burning Tree and Aronimink Golf Club. Ross’s courses are known for being natural and taking advantage of the lay of the land, not the “earth mover” type of golf architecture.

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The Ross Course at French Lick opened for play in 1917 and has recently undergone a $5 million renovation to bring it back to Ross’s original design. Golf courses, like living beings, grow and change over time. In the renovation, bunkers which lost their nearly 100 year battle with the elements and nature were restored to their original specifications.

Overview

The Donald Ross course at French Lick is a par-70. Don’t let that fool you into thinking it is short or easy. In fact, the course clocks in at 7,030 yards which is long even for a par-72 course. The rating from the tips (the Gold Tees) is a strong 72.3 with a slope of 135. A solid test of golf. To accommodate players of all abilities and ages, there are four total sets of tees, the shortest measuring 5,050 yards.

Tee

The way each hole presents itself from the tee of the Ross course is so visually appealing.  The landscape is hilly and features some very large elevation changes.  The tees challenge the golfer to execute an accurate shot or find strategically placed penal areas including bunkers, hazards, long native grassy areas, and trees.  Some tee shots are blind and the help of some course knowledge or at the least, a local caddy is a great thing to have.

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The numerous sets of tees are not boringly arranged on one flat piece of ground a few yards apart.  Rather, each tee set offers the golfer different yardages, elevations, and angles to the target.  Regular golfers could create a very different playing experience by simply changing tees from round to round, or even making up their own combo set.

Fairway

The fairways at the Ross course are welcomingly wide.  That said, there are very few flat areas on the property.  The golfer will be challenged to hit a straight from the fairway due to the undulations and uneven lies.

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Strategically placed bunkers can and will penalize shots which are not placed in the fairway.

Green

Donald Ross is well known for his amazing greens at courses like Pinehurst, Oakland Hills, Aronimink.  Ross’s greens at French Lick are truly amazing; the prime feature of the golf course.  Many of the greens feature the Ross trademark “upside down soup bowl” design, where any shot or even putts too close to the edge are rejected and end up rolling off into collection areas or false fronts.  Those upside down bowl greens (photo below) present some very difficult challenges in the short game.  The player can try hitting a high soft shot, bumping a low shot into the hill and onto the green, or my default choice which is putting.    Getting up and down from greenside at the Ross Course is an accomplishment.

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In fact, getting in the hole in two putts is an accomplishment.  Due to the undulations, slopes, tiers and bowl edges, putting the Ross greens is the biggest challenge of the entire golf course.  A two-putt on any green feels like a birdie.  3-putts can actually be a solid play.

Stay below the hole at all costs.  Because of the speed of the greens and the incredible slopes and undulations, shots which end up above the hole are most often dead.  Stay below the hole, even if that means missing the green short.

Clubhouse

The clubhouse at the Ross Course oozes history and class.  The pro-shop is full of great equipment and apparel and a great staff who are extremely helpful and pleasant to interact with.

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Hagen’s Restaurant has a large indoor and outdoor seating area (right side of above photo).  I enjoyed great food and great service between rounds on a 36-hole day.  Hagen’s is named after Walter Hagen, who won the PGA Championship there in 1924.

Practice Area

The Ross course has an adequate putting/chipping area with a fantastic view (first photo), and very close to Hagen’s to insure the frosty beverages are topped off.

One drawback to the Ross and my only critique: there is no driving range.

Conclusion

The Ross Course is a pristine gem, full of history and personality.  It will challenge golfers of all abilities and especially those like me, who consider themselves good putters.  Be sure to plan a trip to French Lick to experience this historic golf course.  The French Lick Pete Dye course (review coming soon), the Ross Course, and the French Lick Resort and Casino make for a tremendous golf buddy trip.


HOG World Tour Visits Pete Dye Course at French Lick Indiana

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, June 13th, 2016
Categories: GolfGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf LifeHOG World TourTravel
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The Hooked on Golf Blog World Tour was in French Lick, Indiana last week to experience golf and the French Lick Resort. In addition to the fabulous Donald Ross course, I had the opportunity to play the Pete Dye course at French Lick. Wowsies.
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On a difficulty scale from 1-10, the Dye Course is a 12.3. With a course rating of 80.0 and a slope of 148, I’ve not played a more difficult course. And I’ve played some of the world’s most difficult courses like TPC Sawgrass, Wolf Creek, and Carnoustie.
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I will be posting my full review of the French Lick Pete Dye course as soon as I’ve recovered from the beatdown it gave me. Stay tuned.


HOG World Tour Visits the Donald Ross Course at French Lick Indiana

Written by: Tony Korologos | Sunday, June 12th, 2016
Categories: GolfGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf LifeHOG World TourSite NewsTravel
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This past week the HOG World Tour was in French Lick, Indiana to check out two courses from two very different and equally famous golf course architects, Pete Dye and Donald Ross. The Donald Ross Course was the first on the menu, and I loved the entree so much I went back through the buffet a 2nd and 3rd time.

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The Donald Ross Course 10th hole (left) with the practice putting green in the foreground

This was one of the more challenging Donald Ross courses I’ve played due to the large amount of elevation changes and horizontal movement of the holes. And the greens were some of the most extreme I’ve ever putted. Putting or chipping from above the hole is nearly impossible.

Par-3 4th Hole - 240 Yards

Par-3 4th Hole – 240 Yards

I was able to play this fabulous old course (1917) three times. It’s ranked 71st in Golf Digest’s Top-100. I’ll be posting my full review of the experience soon, but wanted to do a quick share and a couple of photos prior to that. Stay tuned.


Played an Old 9-Hole Muni I Haven’t Played in Years

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, May 16th, 2016
Categories: GolfGolf CoursesGolf For WomenHackersHOG World Tour
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I had a wild hair up my shag bag to take in the experience of a course I haven’t played in probably several decades, Nibley Park.  We often refer to it as “The Gib,” which is short for The Gibley.  That comes from “Nibley Gibley.”  So I affectionately said that I was “flogging the Gib.”  I’m glad to clear up the confusion on that now.

This course is a 9-hole par-34 which measures a lengthy 2,895 yards from the blue tees; the tips.  The only par-5 is 453 yards and I hit an 8-iron into that one on my 2nd shot.  Yes I made birdie.

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Play is slow. So people do cartwheels in the fairway to keep themselves entertained…

The Gib is a bit of a beginner’s course, and one which is on the low budget end.  It clocks in at a whopping $11.00 to walk 9-holes.  That’s a price I can live with.  The crowd is, shall we say, more working class than higher end courses in town.  That’s part of the experience I was looking for.  Plus I’m trying to get used to new Miura irons, and new shoes.

I played with two guys who were playing their 2nd round of the year.  I doubt they even have established handicaps.  I had fun playing with them, and watching their match which was 25 cents per hole.  I think 75 cents exchanged hands at the end.  One of the guys was pitching it better than me with what appeared to be a pitching wedge hybrid. See below.

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That P-Hybrid has “internal sole weighting.” I can’t imagine what external sole weighting would be.

The other guy was a lefty and bragged that he got his TaylorMade driver for $10.00 on eBay. I said, “if you only knew.” He got his entire set of clubs on eBay in fact, and said the most expensive club in the bag was his driver. Most of his clubs were $5.00 or less.  As I wielded my brand new shiny Miuras I couldn’t help mumble “if you only knew (my rants about golf product release cycles).”  Later in the round he told me he had seen a set of irons like mine before, when some guy was pawning them.  He said he knew the guy had no business with irons like that.  English translation, they were stolen.  That’s my guess.

I enjoyed playing a more casual round on an easier course, especially one where my rusty spring game didn’t cost me more than my green fees.  Low pressure. I tested some new shoes, a new ball, and got another round in with the new irons.

Post-round I practiced low running chips and short game.  I practiced so long my back was tweaked the next morning.  It took half a day to get myself straightened out.

Game Still MIA

I’m hoping my missing golf game will reappear soon.  I’m thinking the more spring rounds I get in, the closer I’ll get to my game’s return.  Until then my handicap is blowing up and my confidence is like a house of cards.

This year’s goal is to enjoy the walk.  Regardless of the score, that’s what I’m trying to do.  Most of the time I’ve gotten it done.


Salt Lake City Golf Division is Ruining Bonneville Golf Course

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, May 2nd, 2016
Categories: BoneheadsGolfGolf Courses
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This is a painful post to have to write, but I’m compelled to do it.  I was horrified to see heavy equipment in operation this past Saturday at the fabulous Bonneville Golf Course.   Bonneville is a municipal course which was designed by William Bell and has been providing the public great golf and fantastic greens since 1929.  It’s really a gem and is an extremely popular course. “Bonney” is the first real golf course I played as a beginning golfer many years ago.

Unfortunately the heavy machinery was not there to level out the uneven tee boxes, work on improving the greens, fix the bad bunkers, or rip out the crumbling cart parking strips by the tee boxes.  I was shocked to find equipment and workers digging out new cart paths.  Lots of them.

One of the great things about Bonneville was its LACK of cart paths.  Lacking cart paths makes a course much more aesthetically enjoyable.  Plus, with no cart paths by the greens, errant approach shots aren’t bounced into the next county.  That’s over.  The ironic thing is that having cart paths is what makes specific parts of the course shabby and downtrodden.  The paths basically force cart riders to enter and exit in the same places and cause a ton of damage to those areas.  With no paths cart traffic is spread across a wider area and less damage is done to the course.  I know, I’m talking crazy talk, right?

Apparently those who are making the decisions want Bonneville to look like some resort course in Orlando, rather than wanting it to be a great golf course.  Seriously, WTF are they thinking?  Not only that, we keep hearing about how Salt Lake City courses are losing money faster than John Daly loses alimony.  Somehow they scraped up the money for cart paths though. Got it.

Below are a few photos I captured with my phone during that round, showing a few places they’ve begun work on the new paths.  I hope this is all, but I doubt it.  Under each photo are my comments.  If you disagree, I’d love to get your opinion.

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Above is the look from the snack shack which is by the #2, #4, and #11 tees. You can see two paths not very far apart. Yeah great idea to lay down two times the amount of pavement. Wouldn’t it be smarter to lay down less pavement? I know. Crazy talk.

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Above is a view of the par-3 17th green with the new path just a few steps right of the green. Pop quiz: Do you know where most amateurs miss? You guessed it! Where that new cart path is, to the RIGHT. Strategically that cart path is great. If players miss right and hit the path, their ball will either bounce over to the 11th tee and kill someone, or bounce down the path to the ROAD and hit someone’s car, causing them to swerve and hit golfers coming off of of #1 green. Brilliant.

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Above is another view of this great new path which runs from the 17th tee to the green. You can see the rest of the hill where many thousands of carts have come down over the years. No damage of course. No cart path needed.

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Above you can see a photo of the par-4 14th green. Some 5-10 steps left of this green will be a new cart path. This is such a great strategic placement. You see, right of this green is a hill with some trees which can eat balls and never give them back. So the “default miss” for people who bail a little bit on this hole is left. Now if someone goes left, their ball will bounce on the cart path into trees, or toward the 15th tee. The ball likely won’t reach the 15th tee, but will give the golfer an enjoyable impossible flop shot from a downslope over trees. I’m sure that’s just what William Bell had in mind.

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Wow isn’t the photo above beautiful? The view back up to the par-3 15th green from the 16th tee used to be the great green Bonneville bent grass. Now it’s this God-awful “Y” shape of future pavement. Fantastic! This is another strategic blunder too, but even worse than the one by the 17th. This is a 230 yard par-3. Players are always missing this green, mostly right. Yes, new cart path will be right. There will also be path to the left, for those who double cross themselves. And finally, path long for those who over club. Congratulations! You’ve just created a 230 yard version of the 17th at TPC Sawgrass, but instead surrounded the green with pavement instead of water!

Not Likely to be Final Thoughts

Some of the greatest golf courses in the world have no cart paths. The world’s two greatest courses come to mind: Augusta National Golf Club and the Old Course in St Andrews.

Somehow the 87 year-old Bonneville Golf Course has managed to be the most popular course in the state for decades without cart paths. Despite having golf carts, Bonneville’s great drainage, resilient bent grass, and hard ground has meant carts do little damage to the course. So why the change? To me it reeks of someone making decisions who knows nothing about golf, or perhaps doesn’t care. This is someone who doesn’t “get” the experience and authenticity of this great old golf course. This is someone who spends their time sitting at a desk, not walking the golf course.  Their vision of golf is carts, cart paths, and cart fees. This isn’t some Disney course in Orlando. This isn’t a country club. These new paths are an unnecessary expense which will make the course less appealing visually, and produce all sorts of problems from a playability standpoint.

If you disagree with me and think adding cart paths will improve Bonneville, I’d love to engage in some conversation with you. I mean it.

Last year Salt Lake City Golf Division allowed the Arthur Hills airport course Wingpointe to close and has been looking to close another course called Glendale. Now they’re messing with their cash cow Bonneville. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

What will Salt Lake City Golf Division screw up next? Perhaps the best thing for them to do would be to continue to own the courses and bring in a management company to run them and make the decisions they’re clearly not smart enough or equipped enough to make.

On the bright side, Top Golf is opening soon in Salt Lake

UPDATE May 5, 2016

A week later… They are putting in nice looking new sand into the bunkers. See instagram photo below:

A photo posted by Hooked on Golf Blog (@hookedongolfblog) on

I have to give credit where credit is due. Good so see them improving the bunkers, which were previously just dirt with rocks.


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