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First Look: Sun Mountain Club Glider Suitcase

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, October 5th, 2015
Categories: Golf AccessoriesGolf EquipmentGolf For WomenGolf Gear
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I reviewed the Sun Mountain Club Glider Journey golf travel bag a while back. The Club Glider series features FOUR wheels, two of which are retractable. The system makes lugging golf club bags and clubs around airports as easy as can be. Now Sun Mountain is putting that same four wheel setup into luggage.
Sun_Mountain_Club_Glider_Suitcase_02
Soon I’ll be putting this bag to the test and posting my review. I’m thinking perhaps a trip to the Bahamas would be a good test for this bag… Stay tuned.

For now you can see a few more photos of this piece by visiting the Hooked On Golf Blog Sun Mountain image gallery.


CaddyDaddy Co-Pilot Pro Hybrid Golf Travel Bag Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Wednesday, August 26th, 2015
Categories: Golf AccessoriesGolf For WomenGolf GearReviews
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CaddyDaddyI believe in doing proper golf equipment reviews by putting the gear to use in the actual situations it will be used in.  That’s why it took a little while for me to get this review done.  I’ve been using the bag as a standard bag for a few rounds, but just needed to get the thing on an airplane, thrown around by baggage handlers, and put through the paces.  I needed to test out the Caddy Daddy Co-Pilot Pro golf travel bag while traveling via air.  This past weekend at Pechanga in Temecula, California was a good test.

Hybrid Golf Travel Bag – What Is It?

Why the word “hybrid” in the description?  This bag is a hybrid, or combination, of two different bags.  It combines a regular golf bag with a golf travel bag.  Typically golf travel bags are outer covers which enclose and protect a regular golf bag inside.  Travel bags may or may not be hard and often times have wheels.

The Co-Pilot has a hard top which protects the heads of the clubs, and has wheels at the bottom of the bag for rolling through airports.  Those along with a rigid shell make for the travel component of the bag.  Multiple pockets on the outside and sectioned club slots make up the regular golf bag component.

It’s a travel bag and regular playable golf ball all in one.

Models

There are three versions or models of this bag.  The unit I’m reviewing is the Co-Pilot Pro.  That’s the middle-of-the-line model which retails for $159.99 but I found on Amazon for $128.  The lower model is the Co-Pilot Standard edition, while the largest model is the CaddyDaddy Co-Pilot XL golf travel bag.

Colors

These bags are fairly frill free.  Not much of a color selection other than choosing a blue or gray trim against a black bag.

On The Course – In Airports – In Action

The overall footprint of this bag is much smaller than the golf bag/travel bag setup.  So small in fact, the bag fit in the trunk of my cheap rental car, a Nissan Versa.  The bag fit with the hard lid in place and not removed.  The Versa is not a large car.

Putting the lid on with all the clubs isn’t too hard.  Several velcro straps secure the lid, and there are some round metal loops on the bag I used to put carabiners to act as a safety for the lid.  The straps are a bit of a pain as they go through loops which are a little tight, but keep the straps from coming off during travel.

Carting the bag in the long term parking to the shuttle stop and then from the shuttle to the baggage drop-off is aided by a well placed lid handle on top and the wheels on the bottom.  Because of the narrowness of the bag though, it is easy for the bag to tip sideways when rolling.  Not a major issue.

As I was waiting to get off the plane yesterday I watched my bag as it went down the belt from the plane into the grizzly baggage handler’s hands.  I could tell he tossed heavy bags around for sport, probably as training for his run in the UFC heavyweight division.  He grabbed my bag and threw it from the belt into the bag container, at least 6-7 feet in the air.  The bag did it’s job and my clubs were unscathed.  The bag was unscathed as well.

Mission accomplished.

Critiques

As mentioned before my first critique of the bag is the strap system which secures the hard top.  The setup is a bit of a pain to use.  I think it could be better designed.

My second critique is the weak zipper handles.  I put my golf shoes in one pocket, which made it a little tough to zip.  I bent the zipper trying to close the bag, then broke it off trying to unbend it.

On the name I often have a semantic reaction when I see the word “caddy.”  A “caddie” is a person who carries golf clubs.  A caddy is a small storage container, often used for tea.

Final Thoughts

The CaddyDaddy Co-Pilot hybrid golf travel bag is two bags in one, saving space and cost.  Most importantly it saves your golf clubs from damage during travel.  At under $130, it’s a good investment to protect the contents inside, which are likely worth many times more than the cost of the bag.


Monster conquers New York, Philadelphia, Salt Lake, Denver

Written by: Tony Korologos | Saturday, October 21st, 2006
Categories: Golf AccessoriesGolf EquipmentGolf GearGolf LifeReviewsTravel
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Alternate title: Ogio Monster Travel Bag Review

When it comes to the design and functionality of golf bags, backpacks and many other types of sporting bags, Ogio is arguably the most creative, progressive and hip company. I own several Ogio golf bags and I’ve been thrilled with the style, features and durability they all possess.


My Monster in some airport somewhere

No more soft travel bags for me

As my blogging and golf web endeavors grow and I do more and more course reviews, my need for a good golf travel bag has become imperative. A couple of years ago Delta Airlines destroyed one of my golf bags. When I tried to make my claim to get them to reimburse me for the damages Delta refused to pay, sighting new airline policies that they weren’t covering damages to golf clubs anymore. I fought Delta and actually won because their new policy didn’t spell out that damage to golf bags wasn’t covered.

At that point I realized how expensive a mishap at the airline baggage center could be:

$500.00 driver
$799.00 3W
$250.00 Hybrid
$1200.00 Irons
$600 worth of wedges
and a priceless putter.
Total: $3349.00+

If an airline were to trash my entire set of clubs I could be looking at close to a $3500.00 hit, not to mention the inconvenience of assembling a set that has taken me 2 years to put together. Given those thoughts I knew I’d used a soft golf bag for air travel for the last time. It was time to protect that $3K+ investment.

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