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Review: Bridgestone Golf J15DF Driving Forged Irons

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, October 27th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf GearReviews
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This product review of the Bridgestone Golf J15 Driving Forged Irons came at a critical time in my golf game and my attitude.  Anyone who follows this blog and/or my social networks knows of the frustrations I’ve had of late with this beautifully infuriating game of golf.  More on the timing and attitude later.  First let’s take a look at the J15 Driving Forged Irons.

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons - click to see more

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons – click to see more

Construction

The J15 Driving Forged Irons are designed for golfers from the professional level to mid-handicap players.  I fall somewhere in that range as a player who varies from a 1-4 handicap, depending on the time of year.  So they should be a good fit.

The J15DF features a two-piece premium forged carbon steel design.  For those of you readers who don’t know what “forged” really means, it’s one of two primary manufacturing processes irons are typically made from.  The other process is called casting, producing “cast” clubs.  In my opinion forged clubs tend to have a softer feel and provide more “feedback” to the player than cast.  Feedback would be the feel and sound translated to the player from the club.  Feedback gives the player great information with regards to the quality of contact and where it occurs on the club face.  Better players can translate this feedback into how they need to adjust for better contact.   Cast irons on the other hand, don’t often produce this feel.  Most shots, regardless of where they happen on the club face, feel about the same.

These irons feature a “hidden” cavity between the front and the rear of the club head.  This design employs “FAST” technology, or Flex Action Speed Technology.  The cavity and design allows the club’s weight to be moved out toward the perimeter.  Perimeter weighting (another buzz term in the golf industry) provides more forgiveness.

The sole of the club is a little narrower than game improvement clubs (clubs which are meant for higher handicap players).  “Mid Sure Contact Sole” design allows the club to be consistent in the way it interacts and bounces off of the ground.

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons

Specs

Iron Loft Lie
Angle
Length S/W Offset Bounce
3 20° 60.5° 39″ D3 3.5 mm 2.0°
4 22.5° 61.0° 38.5″ D3 3.5 mm 2.0°
5 25° 61.5° 38″ D3 3.0 mm 2.0°
6 28° 62.0° 37.5″ D3 3.0 mm 3.0°
7 32° 62.5° 37″ D3 3.0 mm 3.0°
8 36° 63.0° 36.5″ D3 2.5 mm 4.0°
9 41° 63.5° 36″ D3 2.5 mm 5.0°
PW 46° 64.0° 35.75″ D4 2.5 mm 6.0°

This club is available in right-hand only. Sorry lefties. You’re missing out. While the specs above show a 3-iron, the set I tested is a 4-PW.

Options

A club fitting would help in the setup decision making process without a doubt. I recommend making sure your shafts, lofts, lengths, and lies are all set for your swing. If you already know your specs, you can actually order your exact setup online at the Bridgestone Golf J15 page.

There are well over 20 shaft options available. I ended up with the True Temper Dynamic Gold Pro S300, the stock shafts. They’re fantastic.

The J15DF online configurator offers a choice of 14 grips. The model I’m gaming is the Golf Pride Tour Velvet. While they seemed a bit hard at first, I’ve grown to really like them. I’ll be reviewing the grips in a separate article later.

On The Course

From the first club I hit on the range (still remember it was a 7-iron), to the last one I hit yesterday, I’ve been thrilled with these irons.  I have the opportunity to play many of the world’s best irons from most of the major brands, many custom made.  None of those other irons but the J15DF’s have come close to the feel and control I grew accustomed to with my hand forged set of Hogan irons from nearly 15 years ago.  The feel is butter.

Unlike the old school irons though, these are easier to hit and much longer.  I’ve enjoyed very solid iron length and accuracy since putting the J15DF in the bag.  The control these irons offer is tremendous.  Whether I want to hit a low driving punch 5-iron like I did a few days ago on the par-3 11th to eight feet, or hit a high fade with a 7-iron, these clubs respond.

That high fade with a 7-iron came yesterday, probably my shot of the month.  It was my 2nd shot on the 510 yard par-5 7th.  I was 184 out and needed to carry the shot over some front bunkers and have it release to a back-right pin.  The shot was one of the most pure shots I’ve ever hit and the ball landed within inches of my intended landing spot over one of the bunkers.  It released up a slope in the green and finished at 12 inches from the hole for a tap-in eagle.   That came at a time when my partner and I had just been pressed on the front nine.  #winner

There are many stories I could tell like the 7-iron above, and with the J15DF’s in the bag there will surely be many more.

Critical Timing

I mentioned the critical timing in my opener.  You see, I’ve been struggling so much with my game I was close to quitting.  Not just for a week or two, or for the winter, but forever.  I’d had it.  Then the J15DF’s came in for review.  I was very close to declining the review and quitting.  Out of respect for Bridgestone and how great they’ve been to HOG over the years I decided to do the review. The J15DF irons gave my game a badly needed spark.  They talked me off the proverbial golf cliff.

Now that I’ve become excited about hitting quality iron shots again, winter looms unfortunately.  I’ll be trying to get in as many rounds with these irons as I can until the snow flies.

Conclusion

Bridgestone may be better known for their golf ball products, but you’d be making a mistake if you didn’t check them out before making an iron buying decision.  The Bridgestone Golf J15DF irons provide ultimate distance, control, and feel for golfers of mid-level handicaps and better.   I know exactly where I’m hitting it on the club face because of their fantastic feel and feedback.  I know if I execute shots well with these clubs, the results will be tremendous.


First Look: Bridgestone Golf J15 Driving Forged Irons – J15DF

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, August 20th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf GearSite News
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I’m not sure what’s more fun, setting up my golf club glam shot photo shoots, or testing great golf clubs.  Today we are getting a first look at the new Bridgestone Golf J15 Driving Forged Irons, or J15DF.

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons - click to see more

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons – click to see more

I will start testing these irons soon, and post a review when I’ve got enough rounds with them to give a proper evaluation. Translation: I’m not going to hit three 7-irons on the driving range and rave about how great they are…

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons


Check Out the Dimple Pattern on the New 2015 Bridgestone Golf eSeries Golf Balls

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, January 22nd, 2015
Categories: Golf BallsGolf EquipmentGolf Gear
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Bridgestone Golf has been doing a lot with dimple design in their eSeries.  The eSeries includes the e5, e6, and e7.   Previously, they did a dimple-in-dimple design, which carried over into their tour balls, the B300 series.  I’ve enjoyed the performance of said dimple pattern in the B330 model.

I just received some samples of the new eSeries for 2015 which feature an even more interesting dimple pattern. Below is a photo of the neat sample box.

Sample Box

These balls have a flower-leaf-like pattern where there are circular dimples in the center with irregular hexagon shaped leaves around them. Bridgestone calls it “Web Dimple” technology. The circular dimple still features the dimple-in-dimple pattern. See the image below, with the hexagonal leave shaped dimples highlighted.

Bridgestone Golf e7 Flower Pattern Dimple Highlighted

Bridgestone Golf e7 Flower Pattern Dimple Highlighted

The dimple patterns between the e5, e6, and e7 are slightly different to the naked eye. That’s likely how they get the different flight characteristics.

Bridgestone eSeries Golf Balls 2015

New 2015 Bridgestone Golf eSeries Golf Balls

Look for my reviews of the 2015 Bridgestone Golf eSeries golf balls later this spring.


Drool Alert: Bridgestone Golf Reveals 2015 Iron Line

Written by: Tony Korologos | Wednesday, January 7th, 2015
Categories: Golf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf Gear
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Bridgestone Golf is known mostly as a golf ball company, but they make some killer clubs.  I know, because I’ve gamed many from the J40 Dual Pocket Cavity Irons to the J40 445 Driver.

Bridgestone has updated their 2015 lineup and just announced their newest irons.  There are four models:

  • J15MB Muscle Backs
  • J15CB Cavity Backs
  • J15DF Driving Forged Irons
  • J15DPF Dual Pocket Forged Irons

For details and the full press release on these new irons check out the Bridgestone J15 Irons press release on the HOG sister-site, HOGWire.biz, a golf newswire.  Enjoy the photos below.

J15DF

 

J15MB

 

J15CB

 

DPF


Bridgestone Golf Collegiate Team Logo Hats

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, September 18th, 2014
Categories: Golf AccessoriesGolf ApparelGolf For WomenGolf GearReviews
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I’ll admit it. I can be bought. Send me a golf product with a Utah Utes logo on it and you are guaranteed airtime.

I’m doing a hat review today. Yes some very hard-hitting, groundbreaking golf journalism. Today’s hat is the new Bridgestone Golf collegiate team logo hat. Bridgestone Golf has been offering college logo golf balls for a while and these hats make a great match.

Bridgestone Golf hat with Utes logo  = beautiful!

Bridgestone Golf hat with Utes logo = beautiful!

These adjustable hats are made from 100% washed cotton twill so they’re very comfortable and have a nice relaxed fit. The college team logo (preferably a Utes logo) is embroidered in a 3D effect which looks great. The side of the cap features a Bridgestone Golf logo for those of us who like to show our team colors and our golf colors at the same time.

There are currently 29 teams available for the Bridgestone Collegiate Caps: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Auburn, Boise State, Clemson, Connecticut, Florida, Florida State, Georgia, Kansas, Louisville, Louisiana State, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Oregon State, Penn State, South Carolina, Stanford, Tennessee, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, Utah, Virginia Tech, West Virginia, Wisconsin.

Retail price on these hats is $30.

Conclusion

College logo hats are a great addition and possible new revenue for golf shops in college towns. My local pro-shop sells the hell out of Utah hats which are made by another golf company. Now they can offer another selection from Bridgestone Golf and you can be sure I’ll be letting the merchandise manager know about them!


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