Golf Rules and Regulations


Easy Golf Ruling?

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, March 24th, 2016
Categories: GolfGolf Rules and Regulations
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Here’s where my opening tee shot ended up in my Tuesday league one afternoon.  Easy ruling right?

20150609_155905

I’m not Tiger Woods in 2009 and don’t have 20 people to move a rock for me.  So play it as it lies or take an unplayable lie penalty, right?

Wait a sec though.

This rock is also the 150 yard marker on the hole.  Hmmmm.  Free drop?  Not because it is the 150 marker.  Rocks and shrubs which are natural things cannot by definition be immovable obstructions.  An obstruction is an unnatural thing, like a sprinkler head, bridge, building, yardage pole, drain, cart path.

Rule 24

Bushes or Boulders used as Yardage Markers

Q.Our course has installed bushes that serve as 150-yard markers. Are players entitled to relief from these bushes?

A.No. A bush is a natural object, not artificial, thus it is not an obstruction (Definition of “Obstruction”). The answer is the same regardless of whether it is used to indicate yardage.


Decisions and Rules of Golf Club Throwing

Written by: Tony Korologos | Friday, May 22nd, 2015
Categories: BoneheadsEuropean TourGolfGolf For WomenGolf Rules and RegulationsMiscellaneousPGA TourPro Golf
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Rory McIlory Club Throw

Rory McIlory Club Throw

A couple of months ago Rory McIlory launched an iron into the lake at Trump Doral.  In an awkward moment, the Donald gave Rory the club back on the range the next day.  Then this past week McIlory tossed a 3-wood at the BMW after he was dissatisfied with his shot.

Last week I watched a golfer on my home course, a former basketball player who is well known in Salt Lake (no it is not John Stockton or Karl Malone), toss his driver off of the 18th tee behind him.  The white-headed TaylorMade bounced across the pavement of a local road and ended up near the 4th tee.  He had thrown his club out of bounds.  I yelled over to him, “you threw your club out of bounds.  You are going to have to throw another one off the tee.”  He didn’t think that comment was very funny.  I did though.

These club throwing events I’ve witnessed recently have inspired me to post the Rules of Golf Club Throwing, so those of you golfers who throw a club know exactly how to proceed after.

Rule 69.6: Throw Club In Hazard

In the case of the first McIlory toss into the lake at Doral, rule 69.6 comes into play.  The rule states that if a club is thrown into a hazard the golfer has several options:

  1. Incur one throw penalty. Re-throw the club from the original position.
  2. If the club is throwable from the hazard, the player can throw it from the hazard as long as he doesn’t ground the club or move loose impediments.
  3. Incur one throw penalty. Take a two club drop no nearer the hole at the point in which the club entered the hazard, then throw the club from there.
  4. Incur one throw penalty. Pick a point on the opposite side of the hazard, equidistant to the point the club entered the hazard and throw the club from there.

Rule 69.6 A: Throw Club Out Of Bounds

In the case where the basketball player threw his club out of bounds from the tee there is only one option:

  1. Incur one throw penalty. Re-throw club from tee or original position club was thrown from.

Rule 69.6 B: Thrown Club Lost

I watched a player throw his driver in disgust up at Soldier Hollow Golf Course a couple of years ago.  He threw the driver into some very deep grass.  The grass was not a hazard area and it was not out of bounds.  A player in my group yelled over to the thrower, “you will have to throw a provisional in case you can’t find the first one.”

The options a player has after throwing a club which may be lost are as follows:

  1. Throw a provisional club.  Declare to playing partners that the club is a provisional.  In the event the first throw is not found, the provisional throw becomes the club in play and a one throw penalty is assessed.
  2. The player can declare the first throw lost and throw a second club, under penalty of one throw.
  3. The player can proceed to look for the first thrown club and throw it as it lies if found.  If the club is not found, the player must return to the original throwing position and take a “throw and distance” penalty, throwing a new club.

In the case of McIlory’s throw at the BMW yesterday, the club was not lost and not in a hazard, or unthrowable.  The throw would simply count as a throw and he would throw the next one where it lies.


Phil’s Club Head Breaks Off in Bunker – Silly Rules Question

Written by: Tony Korologos | Friday, March 27th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf Rules and RegulationsGolf VideosMiscellaneousPGA TourPro Golf
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Yesterday at the Valero Texas Open Phil Mickelson broke his 8-iron hitting out of a fairway bunker on the 12th hole. Video is below.

Silly rules question: If Phil Mickelson’s ball ends up back in the bunker along with the club head which broke off, is that a penalty for grounding his club in a hazard on the next shot? Or is the shaft now “the club?”


Golf Book Review: Golf Etiquette Quick Reference

Written by: Tony Korologos | Wednesday, December 10th, 2014
Categories: GolfGolf AccessoriesGolf BooksGolf For WomenGolf Rules and RegulationsMiscellaneousReviews
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I’m thrilled to help increase exposure for the golf book Golf Etiquette Quick Reference – A Golfer’s Guide To Correct Conduct. When golfers learn the game they’re taught swing, stance, grip, technique. They’re never taught the etiquette of the game, where to stand, when to hit, how to care for the course. Those aspects of the game should be just as important as learning the swing itself.

Golf Etiquette Quick Referenc

Golf Etiquette Quick Referenc

This book is arranged in a small, easy-to-carry package which will fit in one’s golf bag for reference if needed. The tips are simple and supported by nice graphics to demonstrate the concept.

golf etiquette

Great tips for the tee…

The book is very thorough, even covering the before and after-round conduct and traditions, like having a drink at the 19th hole.

Putting green etiquette.

Putting green etiquette… be sure to read this part!

Conclusion

This book should be required reading for every golfer.


Golf Ball on Alligator’s Head – Play it as it Lies?

Written by: Tony Korologos | Wednesday, February 5th, 2014
Categories: GolfGolf Rules and Regulations

So your ball comes to rest on the head of an alligator. Do you have to play it from there and risk personal injury or DEATH? Of course not…

The Rules of Golf cover “dangerous situations” like bee hives, alligators, and snakes.

http://www.usga.org/Rule-Books/Rules-of-Golf/Decision-01/#1-4/10

Q.A player’s ball comes to rest in a situation dangerous to the player, e.g., near a live rattlesnake or a bees’ nest. In equity (Rule 1-4), does the player have any options in addition to playing the ball as it lies or, if applicable, proceeding under Rule 26 or 28?

A.Yes. It is unreasonable to expect the player to play from such a dangerous situation and unfair to require the player to incur a penalty under Rule 26 (Water Hazards) or Rule 28 (Ball Unplayable).

If the ball lay through the green, the player may, without penalty, drop a ball within one club-length of and not nearer the hole than the nearest spot not nearer the hole that is not dangerous and is not in a hazard and not on a putting green.

If the ball lay in a hazard, the player may drop a ball, without penalty, within one club-length of and not nearer the hole than the nearest spot not nearer the hole that is not dangerous. If possible, the ball must be dropped in the same hazard and, if not possible, in a similar nearby hazard, but in either case not nearer the hole. If it is not possible for the player to drop the ball in a hazard, he may drop it, under penalty of one stroke, outside the hazard, keeping the point where the original ball lay between the hole and the spot on which the ball is dropped.

If the ball lay on the putting green, the player may, without penalty, place a ball at the nearest spot not nearer the hole that is not dangerous and that is not in a hazard.

If interference by anything other than the dangerous situation makes the stroke clearly impracticable or if the situation would be dangerous only through the use of a clearly unreasonable stroke or an unnecessarily abnormal stance, swing, or direction of play, the player may not take relief as prescribed above, but he is not precluded from proceeding under Rule 26 or 28 if applicable.