Golf Clubs


Review: Bridgestone Golf J15DF Driving Forged Irons

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, October 27th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf GearReviews
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This product review of the Bridgestone Golf J15 Driving Forged Irons came at a critical time in my golf game and my attitude.  Anyone who follows this blog and/or my social networks knows of the frustrations I’ve had of late with this beautifully infuriating game of golf.  More on the timing and attitude later.  First let’s take a look at the J15 Driving Forged Irons.

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons - click to see more

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons – click to see more

Construction

The J15 Driving Forged Irons are designed for golfers from the professional level to mid-handicap players.  I fall somewhere in that range as a player who varies from a 1-4 handicap, depending on the time of year.  So they should be a good fit.

The J15DF features a two-piece premium forged carbon steel design.  For those of you readers who don’t know what “forged” really means, it’s one of two primary manufacturing processes irons are typically made from.  The other process is called casting, producing “cast” clubs.  In my opinion forged clubs tend to have a softer feel and provide more “feedback” to the player than cast.  Feedback would be the feel and sound translated to the player from the club.  Feedback gives the player great information with regards to the quality of contact and where it occurs on the club face.  Better players can translate this feedback into how they need to adjust for better contact.   Cast irons on the other hand, don’t often produce this feel.  Most shots, regardless of where they happen on the club face, feel about the same.

These irons feature a “hidden” cavity between the front and the rear of the club head.  This design employs “FAST” technology, or Flex Action Speed Technology.  The cavity and design allows the club’s weight to be moved out toward the perimeter.  Perimeter weighting (another buzz term in the golf industry) provides more forgiveness.

The sole of the club is a little narrower than game improvement clubs (clubs which are meant for higher handicap players).  “Mid Sure Contact Sole” design allows the club to be consistent in the way it interacts and bounces off of the ground.

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons

Specs

Iron Loft Lie
Angle
Length S/W Offset Bounce
3 20° 60.5° 39″ D3 3.5 mm 2.0°
4 22.5° 61.0° 38.5″ D3 3.5 mm 2.0°
5 25° 61.5° 38″ D3 3.0 mm 2.0°
6 28° 62.0° 37.5″ D3 3.0 mm 3.0°
7 32° 62.5° 37″ D3 3.0 mm 3.0°
8 36° 63.0° 36.5″ D3 2.5 mm 4.0°
9 41° 63.5° 36″ D3 2.5 mm 5.0°
PW 46° 64.0° 35.75″ D4 2.5 mm 6.0°

This club is available in right-hand only. Sorry lefties. You’re missing out. While the specs above show a 3-iron, the set I tested is a 4-PW.

Options

A club fitting would help in the setup decision making process without a doubt. I recommend making sure your shafts, lofts, lengths, and lies are all set for your swing. If you already know your specs, you can actually order your exact setup online at the Bridgestone Golf J15 page.

There are well over 20 shaft options available. I ended up with the True Temper Dynamic Gold Pro S300, the stock shafts. They’re fantastic.

The J15DF online configurator offers a choice of 14 grips. The model I’m gaming is the Golf Pride Tour Velvet. While they seemed a bit hard at first, I’ve grown to really like them. I’ll be reviewing the grips in a separate article later.

On The Course

From the first club I hit on the range (still remember it was a 7-iron), to the last one I hit yesterday, I’ve been thrilled with these irons.  I have the opportunity to play many of the world’s best irons from most of the major brands, many custom made.  None of those other irons but the J15DF’s have come close to the feel and control I grew accustomed to with my hand forged set of Hogan irons from nearly 15 years ago.  The feel is butter.

Unlike the old school irons though, these are easier to hit and much longer.  I’ve enjoyed very solid iron length and accuracy since putting the J15DF in the bag.  The control these irons offer is tremendous.  Whether I want to hit a low driving punch 5-iron like I did a few days ago on the par-3 11th to eight feet, or hit a high fade with a 7-iron, these clubs respond.

That high fade with a 7-iron came yesterday, probably my shot of the month.  It was my 2nd shot on the 510 yard par-5 7th.  I was 184 out and needed to carry the shot over some front bunkers and have it release to a back-right pin.  The shot was one of the most pure shots I’ve ever hit and the ball landed within inches of my intended landing spot over one of the bunkers.  It released up a slope in the green and finished at 12 inches from the hole for a tap-in eagle.   That came at a time when my partner and I had just been pressed on the front nine.  #winner

There are many stories I could tell like the 7-iron above, and with the J15DF’s in the bag there will surely be many more.

Critical Timing

I mentioned the critical timing in my opener.  You see, I’ve been struggling so much with my game I was close to quitting.  Not just for a week or two, or for the winter, but forever.  I’d had it.  Then the J15DF’s came in for review.  I was very close to declining the review and quitting.  Out of respect for Bridgestone and how great they’ve been to HOG over the years I decided to do the review. The J15DF irons gave my game a badly needed spark.  They talked me off the proverbial golf cliff.

Now that I’ve become excited about hitting quality iron shots again, winter looms unfortunately.  I’ll be trying to get in as many rounds with these irons as I can until the snow flies.

Conclusion

Bridgestone may be better known for their golf ball products, but you’d be making a mistake if you didn’t check them out before making an iron buying decision.  The Bridgestone Golf J15DF irons provide ultimate distance, control, and feel for golfers of mid-level handicaps and better.   I know exactly where I’m hitting it on the club face because of their fantastic feel and feedback.  I know if I execute shots well with these clubs, the results will be tremendous.


First Look: Bridgestone Golf J15 Driving Forged Irons – J15DF

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, August 20th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf GearSite News
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I’m not sure what’s more fun, setting up my golf club glam shot photo shoots, or testing great golf clubs.  Today we are getting a first look at the new Bridgestone Golf J15 Driving Forged Irons, or J15DF.

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons - click to see more

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons – click to see more

I will start testing these irons soon, and post a review when I’ve got enough rounds with them to give a proper evaluation. Translation: I’m not going to hit three 7-irons on the driving range and rave about how great they are…

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons

Bridgestone Golf J15DF Irons


First Look – Tour Edge Exotics CB Pro U Hybrid Limited Edition

Written by: Tony Korologos | Friday, July 24th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf For WomenGolf Gear
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In for review is the new Tour Edge Exotics CB Pro U Hybrid Limited Edition. How in the world am I supposed to take this club out of the box and hit it? I’m half tempted to leave it as-is and put it on the wall as a showpiece.

Tour Edge Exotics CB Pro U Hybrid Limited Edition

Tour Edge Exotics CB Pro U Hybrid Limited Edition – click for more photos

Maybe I can cover the whole head with swing tape?

Tour Edge CB Pro U Hybrid Limited Edition

Tour Edge CB Pro U Hybrid Limited Edition – click for more photos

Stay tuned for the full golf club review of the CB Pro U Hybrid. If it comes close to my Tour Edge Exotics XCG7 3-wood, last year’s HOG Product of the Year, I’ll be thrilled.


Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Irons Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Friday, July 10th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf GearReviews
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This is without a doubt the most difficult review I’ve experienced in the 10 years I’ve been reviewing golf equipment on this blog.  Why so difficult?  The process and results didn’t go as I expected and I became frustrated enough that I wanted to bail on these clubs.  Thanks to my friend Doug Bybee at Mizuno I stuck with them.

Mizuno JPX850 Forged Irons

Mizuno JPX850 Forged Irons

For a guy who has been playing 2002 Hogan forged irons for most of the last 13 years (a couple of others went into the gamer bag for a few months here and there) switching to different irons is very tough.  After playing a single brand and model for that long one is (or should be) very in tune and connected to the feel and performance of the clubs.  That was one of the difficult parts of switching to the JPX-850 Forgred irons.  The 850’s had a hell of a tough task, to dethrone what I believed are the best irons I’ve ever played.

Technology

Before I go into the long winded story of my experience with these irons I’ll first mention the technology and engineering involved in making them.

The irons are forged using a “grain flow” forging process. This helps add distance to forged irons that might normally be lost in traditional forging.

1025E steel billets in the head add strength and distance to the club.

The face of the club is super-thin. Thin faces mean more control, forgiveness, and distance. Weight is moved to the outside of the club increasing the clubs COR rating (meaning it resists twisting and turning at impact) and making the club easier to hit.

The 4-7 irons have a slightly different feature, the “Ultra CNC Milled Pocket.” This produces a higher launch angle and ball speeds.

Looks

I have to pat myself on the back in this section of my review. The JPX-850 Forged irons are stunningly beautiful from a purely aesthetic standpoint. I take great pride in my high quality product photos for my reviews.  I have to say these are probably the best iron pictures I’ve ever shot. It helps to start with such great material!

Fitting

The first part of getting the 850’s was to go through the Mizuno fitting.  The fitting was a fun and educational experience. Below is a video from the 2012 PGA Merchandise Show featuring the Mizuno fitting system.  It is a little old, but gives you the idea.

In my fitting I learned that the dual chicken wing granny over the top swing I’ve got may not look pretty, but it is consistent and produces a very good dispersion rate.  In other words, I don’t spray them.

Doug did my fitting along with a local club fitter at my local shop here in Salt Lake City, Uinta Golf.  We did the fitting off of mats on a Flight Scope launch monitor.

During a fitting like this the player will take some swings with a test club and the Mizuno fitting system will produce custom club and shaft recommendations based on the results.  Then the tech will make up a test club with some of those specs for the player to try.  Once again those results are analyzed and the player will also chime in on feel and such.  The process isn’t long and in short order one has the specs of the “pefect club” for his swing.

The results were quite stunning for me.  Where my stock Hogan 6-iron was fairly accurate and fairly long at 180-185 yards, the newly built 850 Forged with custom shaft was even more accurate.  Nearly no dispersion at only 1-2 yards off center.  On top of that, the average distance was 200 yards.

Sold.

I was sold and very excited to get my new clubs.

Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Gap Wedge

Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Gap Wedge

Fast Delivery

It didn’t take long for Mizuno to custom build the clubs and get them to my front door.  Less than a week.  Custom everything, down to the grips.  I couldn’t wait to get to the course and start firing darts at flags and racking up birdies like John Daly racks up ex-wives.

Houston We Have a Problem

Now the frustration part…

I couldn’t wait to hit these, of course.  On the range the day after I got them I was shocked to find myself literally cold-topping almost every swing.  The contact was so bad that sometimes my hands were going numb.  When I did manage to get a shot airborne it didn’t seem to fly well.  It seemed I was missing the sweet spot 95% of the time.

For many rounds over several weeks I became frustrated and disappointed in these irons.  The 6-iron was not going 200.  It didn’t even go as far as my old Hogans.  Most shots  where coming up pathetically and painfully short right.

My confidence was shattered.  So was my wallet.  So were my scores.

Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Irons

Mizuno JPX-850 Forged Irons

I talked to Doug and he did his best to calm me down.  I was surprised to hear him tell me that I had to get used to, and adjust to these clubs.  In my mind I thought they were fitted and adjusted to my swing already.

I was tempted to send the clubs back and put the Hogans back in play, but Doug kept on me and gave me some pep talks.  “These are the 2nd best selling irons in the golf industry” he would tell me. “Give this new technology a chance to work for you.”

Because of Doug and everything Mizuno had done for me, I kept with them.  I kept making small tweaks and trying to figure out the proper swing and proper ball position.  One round “it” happened.  On the par-3 9th at my home curse I picked a 6-iron for a 185 yard shot.  I nailed it, right at the flag.  The shot didn’t go 185.  It flew over the pin, over the green, over the cart path behind the green, and over a tall tree.  My best guess is the shot flew 225 yards.  Unfortunately the ball rolled down behind the trunk of the tree, on a downslope, behind the world’s toughest par-3.  Never before have I been as happy with a shot which had such a horrible result.

That shot told me I could hit these solid, far, and straight.

Over many rounds I started to see slow improvement in the contact and feel.  I wasn’t spraying the irons ever.  It was mostly a distance issue from missing the sweet spot.  I started to find myself hitting a laser at a flag more and more often.  Shots that were so aligned with the pin I’d have to turn my head sideways to see the pin.  I stared off hitting one or maybe two in a round.  As I got more and more used to the clubs my iron play improved greatly.

My swing has been subconsciously adjusting as well as consciously to the 850’s.  My confidence has returned.  I am able to hit “shots” when needed, like low punches under trees, cuts, draws.  Iron play is now fun again and I’m really feeling the clubs without having to make deliberate changes to swing or setup.

Fitting Analysis

Despite the “fitting” it took me about half a year to adjust my swing to these irons.  Maybe I’m a brain dead hacker used to doing the same thing and changing my iron swing was like trying to turn an aircraft carrier?  Perhaps, but I have some other ideas.  I’m a cause and effect guy and over the last couple of months I’ve tried to analyze the fitting and results.  Some items stand out to me which could be factors.

First, the fitting was done on an indoor simulator on a mat.  I hate mats.  When given the choice to warm up or practice on mats I’ll choose to go to the first tee cold.  It is almost impossible for my steep granny swing to hit a bad shot on a mat.  The club bounces up just right.  On real grass though, the club does not bounce up like that.

Second, I was wearing a particular model of FootJoys during the fitting last winter\fall.  This spring my friends at FJ send in a new model to review and the platform is thicker and wider.  As spastic as my swing is that platform difference could make a difference.  If they’re half an inch higher that changes all sorts of angles.  My gamer driver performance is greatly affected by changing from one of those sets of shoes to the other.

JPX-850

Beautiful Mizuno Irons

Finally, my fitting was at a time toward the end of last season.  I had a whole summer of swinging leading up to the fitting, and was probably swinging well during the fitting.  Then I change irons (and shoes) in the first half of the next season, possibly introducing all sorts of factors my rusty hack game wasn’t used to.

The frustration and overly long adjustment period of time could be attributed to one or any combination of the ideas above, or perhaps it is something else I’m not thinking of.  It is golf after all.

Last week I hit a super solid tee shot on the par-3 6th at one of my home courses.  The ball settled in to about three feet.  My long time golf buddy chimed in, “what club was that?”  I answered “an eight.”  He then said, “for the first time in 20 years of playing with you I can’t tell what clubs you are hitting.  That shot flew like a 9-iron but went as far as a 7-iron.”

Conclusion

As bad as my short game is, missing a green in regulation is going to mean a bogey 50-75% of the time, despite being a great putter.  I need to hit greens and let my solid putting take it from there.  That puts pressure on my iron/approach game.  It has taken a while but now I have confidence in the JPX-850 Forged Irons.  The JPX-850 Forged are truly great golf clubs, worthy of Mizuno’s fine reputation as one of the best iron makers in the world.


Exclusive Photos: Not of Anna Rawson But of the New Parsons Xtreme PXG 03119302394320958.87 Niner Bravo Irons

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, June 11th, 2015
Categories: BoneheadsGolf ClubsGolf EquipmentGolf Gear
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I apologize for not posting a photo of Anna Rawson here.

I just posted the news of the new golf company founded by GoDaddy’s Bob Parsons (no he’s not related to the Alan Parsons Project) called Parsons Xtreme Golf.  They are using Anna Rawson as a spokeswoman for their $2,400 irons ($300 per individual iron).  Those irons are the PXG 0311 irons.

PXG 03119302394320958.87 Niner Bravo

Crack HOG insiders have found a prototype image of the next model Parsons Iron, the PXG 03119302394320958.87 Niner Bravo.  Check it out below.  Even more weighting technology.

Parsons_Xtreme_PXG-0311930239432095887NinerBravo

PXG 03119302394320958.87 Niner Bravo – 37 Niner Bravo Weight Technology

This iron uses a new patent-pending PXG 37 Niner Bravo movable weight technology, taking advantage of 37 precisely placed weights on the club. This allows the golfer to fine tune loft, lie, swing weight, launch angle, oxygen level, gravitational pull, altitude density, wind speed, air speed, ground speed, ball speed, club head speed, launch angle spin speed level 12, and 887 other swing characteristics.

Look for Anna Rawson in a bikini or some kind of thong, with this club in her hands, soon.


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