Golf Courses


Another Great American Golf Course Closes – Should Have Tried FootGolf

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, April 25th, 2016
Categories: GolfGolf Courses

This past weekend the Hooked on Golf Blog World Tour visited the fabulous town of Leeds in southwestern Utah. I’m not sure but I don’t recall seeing a single stoplight in Leeds. It’s that big of a town.

I happened to stumble into the KOA Campground in Leeds, quite an interesting place. Don’t ask me how or why I was there, or why I was stumbling. It was at this fine tourist destination that I learned the sad news. American golf has suffered the loss of yet another great golf layout, The Links at Leeds. This links was widely considered one of the best examples of campground links architecture in the world.

Front-9

Back 9

It’s sad to see this once-great layout turning to dust; returning to its natural state (cement with dirt, weeds and a couple of cow milking cans).  This tragedy may have been avoided if the course tried FootGolf, or maybe some USGA “initiative” to grow the game. Those always work.

RIP Links at Leeds. I’ll be playing you in heaven. Actually, I’m probably going to hell, but I digress.


Adios Golf Course Grounds Crew – Your Replacement Autonomous Fairway Mower Has Arrived

Written by: Tony Korologos | Friday, April 15th, 2016
Categories: GolfGolf CoursesGolf VideosMiscellaneous

As a drone builder and flyer I’m interested in autonomous technology. Below is a video and info about an autonomous fairway mower. It mows the course without a human piloting it. I dig the technology but I also worry about potential golf jobs lost with this sort of thing.

About TURFLYNX and the F315 machine

TURFLYNX wants to make a future of mobile robots and information-based solutions for field keeping activities a reality today. We brought to market the first fully autonomous golf course fairway mower.

TURFLYNX’s vision of a mobile-robot and information-based future has resulted in our first product: the F315 autonomous triplex fairway mower.

We currently work hard in the development and marketing of robotic solutions for golf courses and sports fields using mobile robotics technology.

TURFLYNX developed the first autonomous and driverless fairway mower available on the market. A solution tailored to be cost-effective, autonomous, silent and environmentally friendly, with a special focus in reducing the maintenance costs on Golf Courses, addressing the needs of Managers and Greenkeepers, but also guided towards the improvement of the environment and to higher quality standards of the playable area.


Masters Hole By Hole Commentary – One Sentence Each

Written by: Tony Korologos | Friday, April 8th, 2016
Categories: Golf CoursesPro GolfThe Masters
Tags:

While flying to and from Singapore this week (see this post as to why), I wanted to write some comments about the Masters Tournament and the course, Augusta National Golf Club. I wanted to make it fun and challenging, so I decided to try and describe the course hole by hole, but with only one sentence per hole. Having walked the course many times these are my single sentence takes on each hole below:

Hole #1 – Par-4 445 Yards

The first green is an upside down soup bowl which would give fits to any player with a weak short game.

Masters Augustsa Hole-10-short

Caddies in a low spot in front of the 10th green – Photo by Tony Korologos ©

Hole #2 – Par-5 575 Yards

The green looks like a sliver from the fairway.

Hole #3 – Par-4 350 Yards

Though this hole could be drivable from the tee, a full swing from 100+ yards could be easier than a long pitch or chip.

Hole #4 – Par-3 240 Yards

From the Masters tees this long downhill par-3 is frightening.

Hole #5 – Par-4 455 Yards

The 5th green reminds me of the 2nd green at the old course, which may have a Volkswagen Beetle buried under it.

Hole #6 – Par-3 180 Yards

Huge elevation drop results in massive air time on this par-3.

Hole #7 – Par-4 450 Yards

Craziest green complex on the whole course on a steep slope with lots of bunkers.

Hole #8 – Par-5 570 Yards

This reverse-S shaped hole is like two separate worlds between tee and approach.

Hole #9 – Par-4 460 Yards

If you like hitting shots onto a table which is tilted 45 degrees from back to front you will love #9.

Hole #10 – Par-4 495 Yards

TV can’t translate how big this hole is or how dramatic the elevation drop from tee to green is.

Hole #11 – Par-4 505 Yards

The tee shot and approach are the two most challenging consecutive shots at Augusta
National.

Hole #12 – Par-3 155 Yards

Simply the most beautiful par-3 in golf, both aesthetically and architecturally.

Hole #13 – Par-5 510 Yards

The most famous risk/reward hole on the course, until you get to the 15th.

Hole #14 – Par-4 440 Yards

If a hole at Augusta National could be called boring, this would be it.

Hole #15 – Par-5 530 Yards

Anything other than a perfect approach yardage and execution is penalized harshly.

Hole #16 – Par-3 170 Yards

The amphitheater surrounding the 16th (also 17 tee, 6th green, 15th green) is, to coin the phrase, like no other.

Hole #17 – Par-4 440 Yards

The green is very exposed and has many places a player should avoid hitting to, which will result in the ball rolling away.

Hole #18 – Par-4 465 Yards

Every aspect of one’s game, from driving to approach to short game, is fully tested on the finishing hole.


Interesting Minor Change to the Par-5 1st Hole at Salt Lake’s Bonneville Golf Course

Written by: Tony Korologos | Sunday, March 20th, 2016
Categories: GolfGolf Course ArchitectureGolf Courses
Tags:

Last week I was happy to play my first round of 2016 at one of my home courses and favorites, Bonneville Golf Course.  Bonneville is the most popular golf course in the state, home of some of the best greens around.

Last season they switched from manual/hand watering and installed a controversial automated irrigation system.  That’s all done now and a byproduct of said irrigation system is a change on the first hole.  The first is a very reachable par-5.  I’m usually approaching this green with anything from 9-iron to a 5-iron depending on conditions.  Just short of the green is a very steep slope which historically has had very deep grass. That deep grass typically ate balls up, keeping them from bouncing up to the green.  It also made chipping a challenge.

Shot taken with my phone, so not the best quality. This is the slope which is now cut short.

Shot taken with my phone, so not the best quality. This is the slope which is now cut short.

That long grass is gone now.  Apparently one of the reasons for the long grass was a watering issue.  Now that there is a better irrigation system, that grass can be, and is cut short like the fairway.  I’m not sure how this will play out yet.  It could mean many more 2nd shots will bounce up onto the green. It could also mean that short shots and bad chips which don’t make the green may roll back anywhere from 10-30 yards.

It’s going to be interesting to track the scoring and analyze my approaches on #1 this coming season and see how what seems to be a minor change affects the outcome.


St Andrews New Course Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, February 29th, 2016
Categories: Course ReviewsGolfGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf For WomenReviewsTravel
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Now that I’ve confirmed the pending third HOG World Tour trip to St Andrews, Scotland, I can’t help having Scotland on my mind.  It is a magical place.  Sadly 99.999% of the courses in the United States do not play like true scottish links courses.   Scottish golf is a natural, hard style of golf I far prefer to the overly-soft, over-watered, too green, over-manicured courses here in the USA.

One thing most golfers who have not been to there don’t realize is that there are a ton of courses in the town of St Andrews, not just the Old Course.  That’s why I’m always giving people grief when they refer to the Old Course as St Andrews.  “Hey have you played St Andrews?” they ask.  I say, “which course?”  St Andrews is the name of the town, not the course(s).  In the town itself the other courses besides the Old Course include the New Course, Jubilee Course, Eden Course, Strathtyrum Course, The Dukes, and the Balgove Course.   All but the Balgove are within walking distance.  In a few minutes by car one can find even more courses: Castle Course, Torrance Course, Kittocks Course,  Saint Andrews Bay Course, and Kingsbarns Golf Links.

The closest course to the Old Course is the New Course.  While the Old Course dates back to around 1400, the “New” Course opened in 1895.  Yeah, that’s “new” alright.  The New is literally next to the Old.  You can miss a fairway on the Old and the ball may end up on the New, and vice versa.  I don’t recommend that though, because the New is out of bounds if you are on the Old and vice versa.

New Course Overview

Old Tom Morris is the architect of the New Course.  The new is a par-71 course which tips out a 6,625 yards, short by modern standards.  The new has many very similar designs and feels as the Old does, but is a little more straightforward and less quirky.

The course rating is 72.8 with a slope of 127 from the tips.  For those of you in the UK, the standard scratch score (SSS) is 73.  The rating would make the New just a tiny bit tougher than it’s next door neighbor, the Old.

Tee

From the tee, the new presents some great challenges.  The course can be a wee bit (as they say in Scotland) tight.  Errant tee shots will be penalized by bunkers, deep rough and in the worst case, gorse.  If you don’t know what gorse is count yourself lucky.  Gorse is a very nasty dark green bush with thorns which feasts on a strict diet of golf balls and the occasional golfer.  Going into the gorse after a ball is usually not a good idea, unless you like scratching the hell out of yourself and ripping your fine golf apparel to shreds.

Some tee shots can be intimidating

Given the shorter nature of this course and the typical hard ground, driver is not necessary on many of the par-4 or even par-5 holes.  The longest par-5 is 518 yards.  Once again, distance isn’t the most important part of the tee shot at the New.  Accuracy is.

Fairway

The fairways can be tight on the New Course, but fairly flat in most places.  If the golfer has managed to avoid the pitfalls mentioned in the tee description, the approach from the fairway is fairly straightforward.

Left rough approach on the 18th hole

If the golfer misses the fairway but avoids bunkers and gorse, the rough can be very thick and inconsistent.  Difficult lies in the rough may be tempting for the golfer to hit the hero shot, but it is often wise to be more conservative and get the ball back into play.

Green

The greens at the New are quite different than the Old. They’re considerably smaller and less undulating but still guarded well via bunkering and adjoining gorse and rough areas.

Because of the smaller greens, the hard ground, and the ways the greens are protected by bunkering or natural obstacles, I find the greens at the New fairly hard to hit. This puts a premium on short game. A green reached in regulation is not an overly difficult two-putt proposition like the gigantic greens on the Old.

Amenities

The St Andrews Links Clubhouse is a very spacious and large facility featuring the pro shop, Swilcan Restaurant and lockers with showers. I’ve enjoyed a few meals in the Swilcan Restaurant and knocked back some refreshing beverages while overlooking the 18th green. Such a great spot.

St Andrews Links Clubhouse

St Andrews Links Clubhouse

Next to the clubhouse is a nice practice green for getting the feel and working on short game. There is no driving range. The nearest range is a bit of a walk or very short drive to the St Andrews Links Golf Academy.

Tip

The St Andrews Links Trust sells a few different great golf packages. I highly recommend purchasing a three-day or seven-day “ticket.” These packages allow the golfer to play unlimited golf in either three days or seven days on the six Links Trust courses other than the Old. In the middle of the summer there is so much daylight that a hardcore golfer could literally play 3-4 rounds in ONE DAY. I’ve done the 3-day twice now and loved it. In one day I played 18 on the the Jubilee, 18 on the New, and a relaxing 9-holes on the Strathtyrum Course.

Final Thoughts

The New is a fantastic links style golf course. It’s a great course on its own and serves as an excellent alternative or backup for times when the golfer is not able to get a tee time on the Old Course. Plus the cost is a fraction of the Old.

I highly recommend experiencing the New Course when traveling to St Andrews to play golf. The New provides a tremendous and satisfying links experience.

Related Links

Kingsbarns Golf Links Review

Balcomie Links Golf Course, Crail Scotland

Fairmont Hotel St Andrews Review

Ardgowan Hotel St Andrews Review


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