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Forest Dale – Utah’s Oldest Golf Course

Written by: Tony Korologos | Sunday, July 30th, 2017
Categories: Course ReviewsGolfGolf CoursesReviews
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Change of pace for me today.  I played the 9-hole Forest Dale golf course, located in Salt Lake City.  Forest Dale, known by my group as “Foreskin Dale,” is the oldest course in Utah, serving up bogeys since 1906.  Not as old as the New Course in St Andrews (1895), but 111 years isn’t too bad. This is a mini-review.

Forest Dale

Forest Dale Clubhouse and practice green

The clubhouse (above) is actually a historical landmark, placed on the Utah Historical Register. Can grease in the cafe be a historical landmark? It might be as old as the course. I kid. I kid.

This 9-holer is interesting. It features a par-36 but three par-5’s, three par-4’s and three par-3’s.  Here’s the par-3 8th below, what I could call the “signature hole” of the course.

Forest Dale 8th hole

Forest Dale 8th hole

This course is friendly to the very casual, higher handicap golf crowd. No collars required. In fact, I’d be surprised if shirts are required. It’s inexpensive but the rolling hills make it much more interesting than some of the other flat courses in the city. The old-school greens are pretty small, but since the course is moderately short they’re not overly hard to hit. They were quite slow today. Probably more favorable for the typical client the course serves.

I don’t know who the pro in the shop is. Never met him until today. But for a hot Sunday without a lot of people playing, he was very friendly and obviously enjoying his day’s work.

Forest Dale isn’t exactly golf tourist attraction for serious players, but for locals who don’t take themselves too seriously it’s fun. It’s not too hard to get on the course. I checked in with no tee time and was on the first tee before I had a chance to tie my shoes. It was a no-stress, enjoyable day and some decent exercise for me today. Good times.

FORE-st Dale!


Review: Pete Dye Course at French Lick Resort

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, August 9th, 2016
Categories: Course ReviewsGolfGolf CoursesGolf For WomenHOG World TourReviewsTravel
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It has taken a few weeks to process my experience at French Lick Resort’s Pete Dye Course.  I was also slightly sidetracked by a little trip to Scotland in that timeframe.  The dust in my golf cranium has settled.  I’m ready to try and tackle this big review of a big golf course.

French Lick Location

First off, let’s get the location figured out.  French Lick Resort is in Larry Bird country, the towns of French Lick and West Baden Springs in southern Indiana.   The closest major city and airport is Louisville, Kentucky.  Next would be Cincinnati and Indianapolis.  The resort sits on a large and historic estate which dates back to 1845.

The Dye Course is a 5-10 minute drive from the West Baden Springs Hotel and the French Lick Hotel and Casino.  The course lies on one of the highest points of elevation in Indiana, producing a 40 mile panoramic view.

Pete Dye Course Key Facts

First off, one must know who Pete Dye is.  Pete Dye is a Hall of Fame golf course architect who has built some of the most famous courses in the world.  Some of Pete Dye’s most notable courses include Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Harbour Town Golf Links, TPC Sawgrass Stadium (home of THE PLAYERS), Whistling Straits, and PGA West.

French_Lick_Pete_Dye_Course_03

Pete Dye and me

The Pete Dye Course at French Lick is certainly one of the most difficult courses in the USA, if not the world.  The course rating from the tips is an unheard of 80.0.  The slope is a massive 148.  It’s hard to translate those numbers for those who don’t understand rating and slope.  A skilled professional on average would shoot an 80 on this course, on a good day.

The course plays to a par value of 72.  The total yardage is 8,102.  Amongst that hefty yardage is par-3 16th hole which measures 305 yards.  If the length isn’t tough enough, there’s water down the entire right side.

Tee

The views presented to the golfer from the tees are tremendous, challenging, and worthy of not only a solid tee shot, but a solid shutter release of a nice DSLR camera.

1st Tee

1st Tee – The sliver of fairway in line with the cart path is the target

Where to aim from the tee on the Pete Dye course is a tough call on nearly every hole.  Visually the landing areas look extremely narrow and seem like they’re miles away.  Wait a sec… that’s because they are extremely narrow and miles away.  One must know how far they hit their drives or layup shots, exactly.  Then execute a near perfect shot to hit that precise spot to keep a ball in the fairway.  And I’m talking about the par-3’s!  I kid. I kid.  Sort of.

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Review: Donald Ross Course at French Lick Resort

Written by: Tony Korologos | Tuesday, June 28th, 2016
Categories: Course ReviewsGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf For WomenHOG World TourReviewsTravel
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Dornoch, Scotland born Donald Ross began his golf career as an apprentice to Old Tom Morris at the Old Course in St Andrews. Old Tom was the greenskeeper for the Old Course in St Andrews and had designed many of the most famous courses in Scotland and the UK including Carnoustie, Prestwick, Muirfield, Machrihanish, Jubilee, and Balcomie Links. I’ve played a few of those.

Ross moved to the United States in 1899 where he began arguably the most successful architectural career in the history of golf. Ross is credited for designing 600 golf courses. Amongst those 600 are some of the world’s most famous and respected courses, which still stand the test of time. A few of Ross’s most notable courses include Pinehurst No. 2, Seminole, Oak Hill and Oakland Hills. A couple of others I like to add to the list are ones I’ve had the pleasure of playing, Burning Tree and Aronimink Golf Club. Ross’s courses are known for being natural and taking advantage of the lay of the land, not the “earth mover” type of golf architecture.

Donald_Ross_Course_French_Lick

The Ross Course at French Lick opened for play in 1917 and has recently undergone a $5 million renovation to bring it back to Ross’s original design. Golf courses, like living beings, grow and change over time. In the renovation, bunkers which lost their nearly 100 year battle with the elements and nature were restored to their original specifications.

Overview

The Donald Ross course at French Lick is a par-70. Don’t let that fool you into thinking it is short or easy. In fact, the course clocks in at 7,030 yards which is long even for a par-72 course. The rating from the tips (the Gold Tees) is a strong 72.3 with a slope of 135. A solid test of golf. To accommodate players of all abilities and ages, there are four total sets of tees, the shortest measuring 5,050 yards.

Tee

The way each hole presents itself from the tee of the Ross course is so visually appealing.  The landscape is hilly and features some very large elevation changes.  The tees challenge the golfer to execute an accurate shot or find strategically placed penal areas including bunkers, hazards, long native grassy areas, and trees.  Some tee shots are blind and the help of some course knowledge or at the least, a local caddy is a great thing to have.

French_Lick_Donald_Ross_Course_05

The numerous sets of tees are not boringly arranged on one flat piece of ground a few yards apart.  Rather, each tee set offers the golfer different yardages, elevations, and angles to the target.  Regular golfers could create a very different playing experience by simply changing tees from round to round, or even making up their own combo set.

Fairway

The fairways at the Ross course are welcomingly wide.  That said, there are very few flat areas on the property.  The golfer will be challenged to hit a straight from the fairway due to the undulations and uneven lies.

French_Lick_Donald_Ross_Course_08

Strategically placed bunkers can and will penalize shots which are not placed in the fairway.

Green

Donald Ross is well known for his amazing greens at courses like Pinehurst, Oakland Hills, Aronimink.  Ross’s greens at French Lick are truly amazing; the prime feature of the golf course.  Many of the greens feature the Ross trademark “upside down soup bowl” design, where any shot or even putts too close to the edge are rejected and end up rolling off into collection areas or false fronts.  Those upside down bowl greens (photo below) present some very difficult challenges in the short game.  The player can try hitting a high soft shot, bumping a low shot into the hill and onto the green, or my default choice which is putting.    Getting up and down from greenside at the Ross Course is an accomplishment.

Donald_Ross_Course_French_Lick_05

In fact, getting in the hole in two putts is an accomplishment.  Due to the undulations, slopes, tiers and bowl edges, putting the Ross greens is the biggest challenge of the entire golf course.  A two-putt on any green feels like a birdie.  3-putts can actually be a solid play.

Stay below the hole at all costs.  Because of the speed of the greens and the incredible slopes and undulations, shots which end up above the hole are most often dead.  Stay below the hole, even if that means missing the green short.

Clubhouse

The clubhouse at the Ross Course oozes history and class.  The pro-shop is full of great equipment and apparel and a great staff who are extremely helpful and pleasant to interact with.

French_Lick_Donald_Ross_Course_12

Hagen’s Restaurant has a large indoor and outdoor seating area (right side of above photo).  I enjoyed great food and great service between rounds on a 36-hole day.  Hagen’s is named after Walter Hagen, who won the PGA Championship there in 1924.

Practice Area

The Ross course has an adequate putting/chipping area with a fantastic view (first photo), and very close to Hagen’s to insure the frosty beverages are topped off.

One drawback to the Ross and my only critique: there is no driving range.

Conclusion

The Ross Course is a pristine gem, full of history and personality.  It will challenge golfers of all abilities and especially those like me, who consider themselves good putters.  Be sure to plan a trip to French Lick to experience this historic golf course.  The French Lick Pete Dye course (review coming soon), the Ross Course, and the French Lick Resort and Casino make for a tremendous golf buddy trip.


St Andrews New Course Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Monday, February 29th, 2016
Categories: Course ReviewsGolfGolf Course ArchitectureGolf CoursesGolf For WomenReviewsTravel
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Now that I’ve confirmed the pending third HOG World Tour trip to St Andrews, Scotland, I can’t help having Scotland on my mind.  It is a magical place.  Sadly 99.999% of the courses in the United States do not play like true scottish links courses.   Scottish golf is a natural, hard style of golf I far prefer to the overly-soft, over-watered, too green, over-manicured courses here in the USA.

One thing most golfers who have not been to there don’t realize is that there are a ton of courses in the town of St Andrews, not just the Old Course.  That’s why I’m always giving people grief when they refer to the Old Course as St Andrews.  “Hey have you played St Andrews?” they ask.  I say, “which course?”  St Andrews is the name of the town, not the course(s).  In the town itself the other courses besides the Old Course include the New Course, Jubilee Course, Eden Course, Strathtyrum Course, The Dukes, and the Balgove Course.   All but the Balgove are within walking distance.  In a few minutes by car one can find even more courses: Castle Course, Torrance Course, Kittocks Course,  Saint Andrews Bay Course, and Kingsbarns Golf Links.

The closest course to the Old Course is the New Course.  While the Old Course dates back to around 1400, the “New” Course opened in 1895.  Yeah, that’s “new” alright.  The New is literally next to the Old.  You can miss a fairway on the Old and the ball may end up on the New, and vice versa.  I don’t recommend that though, because the New is out of bounds if you are on the Old and vice versa.

New Course Overview

Old Tom Morris is the architect of the New Course.  The new is a par-71 course which tips out a 6,625 yards, short by modern standards.  The new has many very similar designs and feels as the Old does, but is a little more straightforward and less quirky.

The course rating is 72.8 with a slope of 127 from the tips.  For those of you in the UK, the standard scratch score (SSS) is 73.  The rating would make the New just a tiny bit tougher than it’s next door neighbor, the Old.

Tee

From the tee, the new presents some great challenges.  The course can be a wee bit (as they say in Scotland) tight.  Errant tee shots will be penalized by bunkers, deep rough and in the worst case, gorse.  If you don’t know what gorse is count yourself lucky.  Gorse is a very nasty dark green bush with thorns which feasts on a strict diet of golf balls and the occasional golfer.  Going into the gorse after a ball is usually not a good idea, unless you like scratching the hell out of yourself and ripping your fine golf apparel to shreds.

Some tee shots can be intimidating

Given the shorter nature of this course and the typical hard ground, driver is not necessary on many of the par-4 or even par-5 holes.  The longest par-5 is 518 yards.  Once again, distance isn’t the most important part of the tee shot at the New.  Accuracy is.

Fairway

The fairways can be tight on the New Course, but fairly flat in most places.  If the golfer has managed to avoid the pitfalls mentioned in the tee description, the approach from the fairway is fairly straightforward.

Left rough approach on the 18th hole

If the golfer misses the fairway but avoids bunkers and gorse, the rough can be very thick and inconsistent.  Difficult lies in the rough may be tempting for the golfer to hit the hero shot, but it is often wise to be more conservative and get the ball back into play.

Green

The greens at the New are quite different than the Old. They’re considerably smaller and less undulating but still guarded well via bunkering and adjoining gorse and rough areas.

Because of the smaller greens, the hard ground, and the ways the greens are protected by bunkering or natural obstacles, I find the greens at the New fairly hard to hit. This puts a premium on short game. A green reached in regulation is not an overly difficult two-putt proposition like the gigantic greens on the Old.

Amenities

The St Andrews Links Clubhouse is a very spacious and large facility featuring the pro shop, Swilcan Restaurant and lockers with showers. I’ve enjoyed a few meals in the Swilcan Restaurant and knocked back some refreshing beverages while overlooking the 18th green. Such a great spot.

St Andrews Links Clubhouse

St Andrews Links Clubhouse

Next to the clubhouse is a nice practice green for getting the feel and working on short game. There is no driving range. The nearest range is a bit of a walk or very short drive to the St Andrews Links Golf Academy.

Tip

The St Andrews Links Trust sells a few different great golf packages. I highly recommend purchasing a three-day or seven-day “ticket.” These packages allow the golfer to play unlimited golf in either three days or seven days on the six Links Trust courses other than the Old. In the middle of the summer there is so much daylight that a hardcore golfer could literally play 3-4 rounds in ONE DAY. I’ve done the 3-day twice now and loved it. In one day I played 18 on the the Jubilee, 18 on the New, and a relaxing 9-holes on the Strathtyrum Course.

Final Thoughts

The New is a fantastic links style golf course. It’s a great course on its own and serves as an excellent alternative or backup for times when the golfer is not able to get a tee time on the Old Course. Plus the cost is a fraction of the Old.

I highly recommend experiencing the New Course when traveling to St Andrews to play golf. The New provides a tremendous and satisfying links experience.

Related Links

Kingsbarns Golf Links Review

Balcomie Links Golf Course, Crail Scotland

Fairmont Hotel St Andrews Review

Ardgowan Hotel St Andrews Review


Pechanga Resort & Casino Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Thursday, November 5th, 2015
Categories: Course ReviewsGolf CoursesGolf For WomenGolf LifeGolf LifestyleHOG World TourReviews
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Recently the Hooked On Golf Blog World Tour spent some time at Pechanga Resort & Casino, located in Temecula, California. My stay was fabulous and I enjoyed as much of the amenities, food, and golf as I could squeeze in. I didn’t get to it all, so I hope to return and finish the job soon! Let’s take a look at Pechanga Resort & Casino.

Pechanga Hotel Left - Golf Clubhouse Right

Pechanga Hotel Left – Golf Clubhouse Right

Overview

Pechanga is a resort/casino which features 517 luxurious rooms of varying levels. The casino area is enormous, as big as any mega-resort in Vegas. As one walks in the main entrance, indoor waterfalls and interesting interior design please the eye.

Within the casino areas just about any form of gaming one would like to experience is there, from blackjack, craps, slots, to a massive bingo parlor. It’s all there.

It would take a week of three-meals per day to scratch the surface on Pechanga’s dining offerings, from fine dining to a food court which rivals large malls.

After a long day of recreating, work, or winning megabucks at the casino, Pechanga offers a full spa with various treatments and services.

Last but not least, “The Journey” at Pechanga is the on-site golf course which features fantastic views, elevation changes, and prime golf conditions. Check out the Hooked On Golf Blog Journey at Pechanga review here.

Location Location Location

What would a perfect golf/casino/resort location be? I’d say somewhere warm with access to major international airports, perhaps close to major metropolitan areas. And to put it over the top I’d say it would be located in a great area for vineyards wine.  Pechanga fits the bill on all accounts. The resort is located almost exactly halfway between Los Angeles and San Diego in Temecula, California. When I was flying in I was able to choose flights by comparing cost to LA or San Diego airports. This time around, it was the best deal to fly into San Diego and take the 45-60 minute drive north to Temecula.

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