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TaylorMade Project (a) Golf Ball

TaylorMade Project (a) Golf Ball Review

Written by: Tony Korologos | Date: Tuesday, May 5th, 2015
Categories: GolfGolf BallsGolf EquipmentGolf For WomenGolf GearReviews
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TaylorMade Project (a) Golf Ball

TaylorMade Project (a) Golf Ball

Soft golf balls are the rage right now.  That’s great for me as they don’t aggravate my tennis/golfer’s elbow and my driver swing speed is around 100mph.  The problem with many of the softer balls which have been produced over the last few years is that they don’t have good spin characteristics in the short game end of things.  That’s where balls like the TaylorMade Project (a) are filling the gap.  The (a) in the name stands for “amateur.”  The ball is designed for amateur swing speeds but has a cover design and materials which produce “tour” level spin and feel in the short game.

Construction

The Project (a) is a 3-piece ball, meaning it has three separate layers.  Each layer gives the ball certain performance characteristics.

Most “tour” or high quality golf balls feature a thin cover made from a material called urethane.  Urethane is found in the covers of nearly every great golf ball, but not often found on the covers of amateur balls.  The Project (a) ball does feature a soft urethane cover.  This is what gives this ball far more spin from 30 yards an in than most mid-level amateur golf balls.

The next layer is the mantle layer. This layer also contributes to the ball’s short game spin.

The innermost layer, called the core, is the powerhouse of the ball. The core gives the ball its distance and feel on full shots, and especially off the driver.

My unscientific and rough measurement of the ball’s compression via a very cool golf ball compression measuring tool called the Hexcaliber, shows the ball to be just above a 90.

taylormade project a

TaylorMade Project (a) Golf Ball Compression Measurement

In the “old” days tour swing speeds matched up with balls having 100 compression or higher. Amateur golf swing speeds were between 85-100, and women’s balls around 80 compression. These days there are many balls in the 80 range, and even some down at 50 or less.

Hands-On – On The Course

I’ve quite enjoyed my testing rounds with this ball. The elbow feels great. Harder golf balls beat up my golfer’s elbow, which is why I can’t play them.  No issues with this softer ball.

The compression level of this ball works well with my very amateur swing speed.  I have plenty of distance.  Plenty.  Like I mentioned, I top out at around 100mph but can get it up to maybe 105 if I’m swinging hard.

The feel the ball has on iron shots is great.  I can feel the ball compress and I can sense the control I have when working the ball either direction or trying to control my “traj” (trajectory).

As advertised this ball is great from not only 30 yards and in, but I’d say from 100 yards and in.  Short game is my achilles heel but I’ve had success chipping and pitching with this ball and getting that little bit of bite around the greens.

Conclusion

I’ve found the TaylorMade Project (a) golf balls on Amazon for under $32 per dozen, which is close to half the price of some “tour” balls.  And for the amateur this ball may be better than those more expensive balls due to the slightly lower compression.  The cover is the same.

If you’re a regular golfing Joe with an average swing speed who needs an affordable high performing golf ball, the Project (a) could be the ticket.  These could also be good balls for some of the better lady golfers.

Father’s Day is coming up by the way.  A box of TaylorMade Project (a) golf balls would make a great Father’s Day golf gift.

2 responses to “TaylorMade Project (a) Golf Ball Review”

  1. oldpromoe says:

    Please tell me what an amateur’s average swing speed is because most of my group don’t get to 100mph.

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